Archive for the ‘date-a-base’ Category

Next Year’s News: 50 Newsworthy Anniversaries in September 2017

Monday, 13 March 2017

Here are 50 newsworthy anniversaries coming up in September 2017 for you to write about and make money from. The anniversaries are listed 6 months in advance to give you enough time to find markets, and research and write your articles.

We have painstakingly cross-checked every entry, but you are advised to check all facts again as part of your research. Please let us know of any errors you find.


The Date-A-Base Book 2017The listing below is a small sample of the entries for September from The Date-A-Base Book 2017
There are 328 anniversaries for September in the book (more than six times more than listed here). The book covers the whole of 2017 from January to December and features more than 4,000 anniversaries in total.

If you need to work further ahead, Next Year’s News 2018 (the new name for the Date-A-Base Book series) is also available!

Just one published article should cover the cost of your copy many times over – and the book also explains how to get your anniversary articles and features published in newspapers and magazines, on radio and TV, and on paid sites online.

400 years ago (25 Sep 1617)
Death of Go-Yozei, Emperor of Japan (1586-1611).

300 years ago (24 Sep 1717)
Birth of Horace Walpole, 4th Earl of Orford, British novelist and politician. Son of Prime Minister Robert Walpole. Known for The Castle of Otranto – regarded as the first Gothic novel. He built Strawberry Hill House in Twickenham, London, which initiated the revival of the Gothic style in British architecture. He was also a prolific letter writer, and they are of significant political and social interest.

250 years ago (4 Sep 1767)
Death of Charles Townshend, British politician. Chancellor of the Exchequer (1766-67) whose taxation of imports into the British colonies in North America eventually led to the American Revolution.

200 years ago (5 Sep 1817)
Birth of Aleksey Konstantinovich Tolstoy, Count Tolstoy, important Russian poet, novelist and playwright. (Not to be confused with Leo Tolstoy – his second cousin.)

150 years ago (4 Sep 1867)
Sheffield Wednesday Football Club was founded in the UK.

150 years ago (21 Sep 1867)
Scottish surgeon Joseph Lister’s ground-breaking paper On the Antiseptic Principle in the Practice of Surgery was published in the medical journal The Lancet. It documented his successful use of carbolic acid (phenol) to sterilise operating theatres, dressings, wounds, surgeons’ gloves and surgical instruments, significantly reducing the rate of infection.

150 years ago (21 Sep 1867)
Birth of Henry L. Stimson, U.S. Secretary of War (1911-13, 1940-45), Governor-General of the Philippines (1927-29), Secretary of State (1929-33).

125 years ago (6 Sep 1892)
Birth of Sir Edward Appleton, British physicist and educator. Winner of the 1947 Nobel Prize for Physics for discovering the Appleton layer of the ionosphere, which reflects radio waves and is useful in communication.

125 years ago (8 Sep 1892)
The original version of the USA’s Pledge of Allegiance was first published in the children’s magazine The Youth’s Companion. It was written by Baptist minister Francis Bellamy. (The current version dates from 1954.)

100 years ago (11 Sep 1917)
Birth of Ferdinand Marcos, President of the Philippines (1965-86). Known for his authoritarian regime which was criticised for its corruption and the suppression of democracy.

100 years ago (27 Sep 1917)
Death of Edgar Degas, French Impressionist artist and sculptor.

100 years ago (30 Sep or 30 Jun 1917)
Birth of Buddy Rich, American jazz drum virtuoso and big band leader. Billed as ‘the world’s greatest drummer’.

90 years ago (7 Sep 1927)
American inventor Philo Farnsworth, aged 21, demonstrated the world’s first fully electronic television system in San Francisco, California. (He worked on a farm as a boy – the idea of scanning an image as a series of lines came from ploughing fields.)

90 years ago (18 Sep 1927)
The birth of CBS. The United Independent Broadcasters radio network (established in January 1927) was rescued by the Columbia Phonograph Company and renamed Columbia Phonographic Broadcasting System. The name was soon shortened to Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS).

80 years ago (21 Sep 1937)
J. R. R. Tolkien’s novel The Hobbit was published.

75 years ago (3 Sep 1942)
World War II: Jewish uprising in the Lakhva Ghetto, Belarus. Thought to be the first ghetto uprising of the war.

75 years ago (4 Sep 1942)
World War II: Compulsory Work Service was introduced in France. All able-bodied men aged 18 – 50 and single women aged 21 – 35 were required to make themselves available to work in Germany. The Germans would release 1 French prisoner-of-war for every 3 French workers who went to Germany.

75 years ago (9 Sep 1942)
World War II: a Japanese seaplane dropped incendiaries on Wheeler Ridge, Oregon, USA in a (failed) attempt to start forest fires. This was the first time an enemy aircraft bombed the U.S. mainland.

75 years ago (12 Sep 1942)
World War II: the Laconia Incident. The British troopship Laconia was hit by a German torpedo and sank off the coast of West Africa, killing around 1,400 men. This had far-reaching consequences as the ship was carrying 1,500 Italian prisoners-of-war. When the Germans realised this they launched a rescue mission, but were then bombed by the Americans, despite displaying the Red Cross flag.

75 years ago (19 Sep 1942)
Death of Condé Montrose Nast, American magazine publisher (Vogue, Vanity Fair, The New Yorker and more).

70 years ago (18 Sep 1947)
The U.S. National Security Council and Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) were established, the Department of Defense began operating, and the U.S. Air Force was established as a separate branch of the military.

65 years ago (6 Sep 1952)
Farnborough Air Show crash, Hampshire, UK. A de Havilland fighter jet broke apart and fell into the crowd, killing 31 people. Stringent safety measures were introduced to ensure this could never happen again.

65 years ago (6 Sep 1952)
The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) launched its first television broadcasts, in Montreal.

60 years ago (4 Sep 1957)
Little Rock Crisis, Arkansas, USA. Nine black students enrolled at Little Rock Central High School. On 23rd September they were forced to withdraw because white mobs prevented them from entering. On 25th September U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower sent 300 National Guards to the school to enforce desegregation, which allowed the students to return. (In September 1958 the four high schools in the district closed for a year, preventing both black and white students from attending. The intention was that the buildings would be leased to private schools, side-stepping the ruling that public schools must be integrated. However, the schools remained closed for the full year – known as the ‘lost year’.)

60 years ago (9 Sep 1957)
The Civil Rights Act of 1957 was enacted in the USA. It was the first civil rights bill to pass Congress since the Reconstruction era in 1875. The Act aimed to remove discrimination against non-white voters and to integrate public schools, but it proved difficult to enforce. (This led to the Civil Rights Act of 1960, which aimed to address the 1957 Act’s shortcomings.)

60 years ago (12 Sep 1957)
The North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) was established.

50 years ago (1 Sep 1967)
Death of Siegfried Sassoon, British poet, writer and soldier. One of the leading poets of WWI. Particularly known for his anti-war poetry and autobiographical works.

50 years ago (20 Sep 1967)
The British ocean liner Queen Elizabeth 2 (better known as the QE2) was launched. (It was retired from active service in November 2008. There are plans to turn it into a luxury hotel.)

50 years ago (29 Sep 1967)
The first episode of the science fiction TV series Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons was broadcast on ITV in the UK. Created by Gerry and Sylvia Anderson, it used the same Supermarionation system of puppetry and scale models as their earlier series Thunderbirds.

50 years ago (30 Sep 1967)
The BBC reorganised its radio network: BBC Radio 1 was launched. The BBC Light Programme became BBC Radio 2. The BBC Third Programme and BBC Music Programme were merged and became BBC Radio 3. The BBC Home Service became BBC Radio 4.

40 years ago (5 Sep 1977)
NASA launched its Voyager 1 spacecraft (2 weeks after Voyager 2) on a mission to study the outer Solar System. On 18th September it sent back the first-ever photograph of the Earth and Moon together in a single image. In August 2012 it became the first spacecraft to enter interstellar space (disputed). It is still operating and in communication with Earth.

40 years ago (12 Sep 1977)
Death of Steve Biko, South African anti-apartheid activist. Founder of the Black Consciousness Movement. (He was arrested at a police roadblock on 18th August and died from injuries received while in police custody, leading to an international outcry. He became a martyr for South African black nationalism.)

30 years ago (26 Sep 1987)
The first episode of the science fiction television series Star Trek: The Next Generation was broadcast in the USA. (UK: 26th September 1990.)

25 years ago (7 Sep 1992)
The radio station Classic FM began broadcasting in the UK.

25 years ago (12 Sep 1992)
Death of Anthony Perkins, American stage and film actor and singer. Best known for his role as Norman Bates in the Hitchcock thriller Psycho.

25 years ago (16 Sep 1992)
Black Wednesday sterling crisis. Britain crashed out of the European Exchange Rate Mechanism (ERM), raised interest rates from 10% to 15%, and spent billions of pounds buying up sterling that was being frantically disposed of on international financial markets.

25 years ago (24 Sep 1992)
The Sci-Fi Channel (now SyFy) launched in the USA.

20 years ago (5 Sep 1997)
Death of Mother Teresa of Calcutta, Macedonian-born/Albanian Indian nun and humanitarian. Founder of the Missionaries of Charity. Winner of the 1979 Nobel Peace Prize. Beatified October 2003.

20 years ago (5 Sep 1997)
Death of Georg Solti, Hungarian-born British conductor.

20 years ago (9 Sep 1997)
Sinn Fein formally renounced violence and committed itself to resolving the troubles in Northern Ireland through peaceful means.

20 years ago (11 Sep 1997)
In a referendum the people of Scotland voted to establish their own Parliament. (Opened 1st July 1999).

20 years ago (18 Sep 1997)
In a referendum the people of Wales voted to create the National Assembly for Wales, with devolved powers from Westminster. (Opened May 1999.)

20 years ago (19 Sep 1997)
Southall train disaster, west London, UK. An Intercity 125 passenger train crashed into a freight train that was being shunted across the line, after the driver missed 2 signals to stop. A warning system on the train was broken and an automatic braking system had been disabled as the driver was not trained to use it. 6 people were killed and more than 150 injured.

20 years ago (29 Sep 1997)
BSE (mad cow disease): British scientists announced that they had established a link between BSE and the human brain disease vCJD.

20 years ago (29 Sep 1997)
Death of Roy Lichtenstein, American artist. One of the founders of the Pop Art movement.

10 years ago (3 Sep 2007)
Death of Jane Tomlinson, British charity campaigner who undertook a series of athletic fundraising challenges after being diagnosed with terminal cancer.

10 years ago (6 Sep 2007)
Death of Luciano Pavarotti, Italian tenor.

10 years ago (10 Sep 2007)
Death of Dame Anita Roddick, British cosmetics manufacturer and retailer, and social, environmental and animal rights activist. Founder of The Body Shop chain. (Hepatitis C.)

10 years ago (22 Sep 2007)
Death of Marcel Marceau, French mime artist and actor (Bip the clown).

10 years ago (29 Sep 2007)
The world’s first commercial nuclear power station, Calder Hall in Cumbria, UK, was demolished. It operated from 1956 to 2003.


Become a lifetime member of ideas4writers
and get ALL 40 of our ebooks
(including The Date-A-Base Book 2017 and
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Price if purchased individually: £214.56
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Next Year’s News: 50 Newsworthy Anniversaries in August 2017 for you to write about

Tuesday, 14 February 2017

Here are 50 newsworthy anniversaries coming up in August 2017 for you to write about (and make money from). The anniversaries are listed 6 months in advance to give you enough time to find markets, and research and write your articles.

We have painstakingly cross-checked every entry, but you are advised to check all facts again as part of your research. Please let us know of any errors you find.


The Date-A-Base Book 2017The listing below is a small sample of the entries for August from The Date-A-Base Book 2017
There are 303 anniversaries for August in the book (more than six times more than listed here). The book covers the whole of 2017 from January to December and features more than 4,000 anniversaries in total.

If you need to work further ahead, Next Year’s News 2018 (the new name for the Date-A-Base Book series) is also available!

Just one published article should cover the cost of your copy many times over – and the book also explains how to get your anniversary articles and features published in newspapers and magazines, on radio and TV, and on paid sites online.

300 years ago (22 Aug – 30 Oct 1717)
The Spanish conquest of Sardinia. This led to the War of the Quadruple Alliance (1718-20).

150 years ago (3 Aug 1867)
Birth of Stanley Baldwin, British Prime Minister (1923-24, 1924-29, 1935-37). He led the government during the 1926 General Strike, the 1935 Ethiopian crisis and the 1936 abdication crisis. He is the only British Prime Minister to have served under 3 monarchs.

150 years ago (14 Aug 1867)
Birth of John Galsworthy, British novelist and playwright. Best known for The Forsyte Saga. Winner of the 1932 Nobel Prize for Literature.

150 years ago (25 Aug 1867)
Death of Michael Faraday, British physicist and chemist. Noted for his many contributions to the fields of electromagnetism and electrochemistry, especially electromagnetic induction, diamagnetism and electrolysis.

150 years ago (31 Aug 1867)
Death of Charles Baudelaire, important French poet, essayist, literary and art critic, and translator of the works of Edgar Allan Poe. Best known for his poetry collection Les Fleurs du mal (The Flowers of Evil).

125 years ago (4 Aug 1892)
The father and step-mother of Lizzie Borden were found murdered at their home in Fall River, Massachusetts, USA. Lizzie was accused of killing them with an axe, but was later acquitted. Police said they were not looking for anyone else in connection with the crime, and Lizzie was ostracised for the rest of her life. It was one of the most sensational murder cases of that period, and speculation continues to this day. The story has been recounted in numerous books, films, TV shows, plays, songs, and a popular skipping rhyme.

125 years ago (24 Aug 1892)
Goodison Park opened in Liverpool, UK. It was one of the world’s first purpose-built football (soccer) stadiums, and is the home of Everton FC.

100 years ago (6 Aug 1917)
Birth of Robert Mitchum, American film actor. Best known for his roles as a gritty anti-hero.

100 years ago (18 Aug 1917)
Great Thessaloniki Fire, Greece. Two-thirds of Greece’s second-largest city was destroyed by fire. 72,000 people were left homeless. (Cause: a spark from an unattended kitchen fire ignited a pile of straw. The resulting fire swept through the city, fanned by strong wind.)

100 years ago (18 Aug 1917)
Birth of Caspar Weinberger, U.S. Secretary of Defense (1981-87) and businessman. He resigned over his involvement in the Iran-Contra scandal, but was pardoned shortly before his trial was due to begin. He later became chairman of Forbes magazine.

100 years ago (22 Aug 1917)
Birth of John Lee Hooker, American blues singer, songwriter and guitarist.

80 years ago (2 Aug 1937)
The Marijuana Tax Act was passed in the USA. It was a significant step towards the criminalisation of cannabis. (It came into effect on 1st October. It was repealed and replaced by the Controlled Substances Act in 1970.)

80 years ago (13 Aug – 26 Nov 1937)
Second Sino-Japanese War – the Battle of Shanghai (China). Japanese victory. One of the largest and bloodiest battles of the war.

80 years ago (28 Aug 1937)
The Toyota Motor Corporation was founded as an independent company in Japan. (It began in 1933 as part of the Toyoda Automatic Loom Works.)

75 years ago (1 Aug 1942)
Birth of Jerry Garcia, American rock singer, guitarist and songwriter (Grateful Dead). (Died 1995.)

75 years ago (7 Aug 1942 – 9 Feb 1943)
World War II – the Battle of Guadalcanal (Solomon Islands). The Allies’ first major offensive in the Pacific. Strategic Allied victory.

75 years ago (9 Aug 1942)
Mahatma Gandhi launched the Quit India Movement after being arrested by British forces in Bombay.

75 years ago (11 Aug 1942)
Austrian-born American actress Hedy Lamarr and American composer George Antheil were granted a U.S. patent for their frequency-hopping spread spectrum communication system. They developed the system as part of the U.S. war effort – it prevented radio-controlled torpedoes from being jammed by the enemy. The system was later adopted as the basis for wireless phones and Wi-Fi computer networking.

75 years ago (12 Aug 1942)
World War II – the Second Moscow Conference. British Prime Minister Winston Churchill met with Soviet leader Joseph Stalin and U.S. envoy W. Averell Harriman to discuss war strategy, plan the North Africa Campaign, and discuss opening a new front in northern France.

75 years ago (13 Aug 1942)
The première of Walt Disney’s animated feature film Bambi. (Released 21st August. UK première: 8th August.)

75 years ago (17 Aug 1942)
World War II: the first US-only bombing raid in Europe. The U.S. Eighth Air Force attacked marshalling yards at Rouen/Sotteville in Normandy, France. Sam Junkin became the first U.S. pilot to shoot down a German fighter plane.

75 years ago (23 Aug 1942 – 2 Feb 1943)
World War II – the Battle of Stalingrad (Soviet Union). The turning point in the war in Europe. Regarded as the largest and bloodiest battle in the history of warfare, and one that the Germans never recovered from. Decisive Soviet victory.

70 years ago (7 Aug 1947)
Norwegian adventurer Thor Heyerdahl’s raft Kon-Tiki reached Raroia, Tuamotu Islands, French Polynesia after a 101-day journey across the Pacific from South America. This demonstrated that people from pre-Columbian South America could have made the journey and settled there.

70 years ago (14 Aug 1947)
Pakistan gained its independence from the UK. Muhammad Ali Jinnah was its first Governor-General. (Pakistan and India both officially became independent at midnight on 15th August, but Pakistan held its independence ceremony 30 minutes early, on 14th, and now celebrates 14th August as its independence day.)

70 years ago (15 Aug 1947)
India gained its independence from the UK.

65 years ago (15 Aug 1952)
Lynmouth flood, Devon, UK. 34 people were killed and buildings and bridges devastated as a flood swept through the village.

60 years ago (5 Aug 1957)
The first episode of the dance show American Bandstand was broadcast on ABC TV in the USA. (It began as a local TV show called Bandstand in Philadelphia in 1952.)

60 years ago (31 Aug 1957)
The Federation of Malaya (now Malaysia) gained its independence from the UK.

50 years ago (8 Aug 1967)
The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) was founded.

50 years ago (9 Aug 1967)
Death of Joe Orton, British playwright. Known for his outrageous farces and black comedies. Best known for Entertaining Mr. Sloane, Loot and What the Butler Saw. (Murder-suicide by his lover.)

50 years ago (14 Aug 1967)
The Marine, Etc. Broadcasting Offences Act came into effect in the UK. It banned radio and television broadcasts being made into Britain from outside its territory, including airspace and bodies of water. It effectively made offshore pirate radio stations illegal, as well as outlawing pirate TV stations and aircraft-based broadcasts that were being planned.

50 years ago (15 Aug 1967)
Death of René Magritte, Belgian Surrealist artist.

50 years ago (27 Aug 1967)
Death of Brian Epstein, British music entrepreneur. Best known as the manager of the Beatles. (Accidental overdose of sleeping pills.)

40 years ago (15 Aug 1977)
The ‘Wow! Signal’ was detected by American astronomer Jerry R. Ehman while he was working on a SETI project using the Big Ear radio telescope at Ohio State University. The 72-second strong narrowband signal appeared to come from the M55 globular cluster in the constellation Sagittarius, but it has not been detected since.

40 years ago (16 Aug 1977)
Death of Elvis Presley, (‘The King’), iconic American rock and roll singer, guitarist and actor.

40 years ago (20 Aug 1977)
NASA launched its Voyager 2 spacecraft on a mission to study the outer solar system and (eventually) interstellar space. It is the only spacecraft to have visited Uranus and Neptune. (It also visited Jupiter and Saturn.) It remains operational and in communication with Earth. Both Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 carry a gold-plated audio-visual disc featuring photos and sounds from Earth as well as scientific information.

40 years ago (23 Aug 1977)
The first VHS video recorder was released in the USA – the RCA VBT200. (The first VHS video recorder in the UK was the Victor HR-3300, released in 1978 by JVC. That model had been on sale in Japan since October 1976.)

30 years ago (1 Aug 1987)
The entertainment television network MTV Europe was launched. The first music video it played was Money for Nothing by Dire Straits.

30 years ago (15 Aug 1987)
Corporal punishment was banned in British state schools.

30 years ago (19 Aug 1987)
Hungerford Massacre, Berkshire, UK. Michael Ryan went on a shooting rampage around the town, killing 16 people (including his mother) before committing suicide.

25 years ago (12 Aug 1992)
Death of John Cage, American avant-garde composer.

25 years ago (20 Aug 1992)
Britain’s Daily Mirror newspaper published compromising photographs of the Duchess of York (Sarah Ferguson) on holiday in France with her ‘financial adviser’ John Bryan, who could be seen sucking her toes while she was topless.

25 years ago (24 Aug 1992)
Hurricane Andrew hit Florida, USA, causing a record $26.5 billion (£17 billion) worth of damage (surpassed by Hurricane Katrina in 2005). The Bahamas and Louisiana were also hit. 65 people were killed.

25 years ago (30 Aug 1992)
Astronomers David Jewitt and Jane Luu discovered the first Kuiper belt object after 5 years of searching. (The Kuiper belt is a region of the solar system beyond the orbit of Neptune and includes the dwarf planet Pluto. More than 100,000 Kuiper belt objects with a diameter larger than 62 miles (100 km) are believed to exist. Over 1,000 have been discovered so far.)

25 years ago (30 Aug 1992)
German racing driver Michael Schumacher won the Belgian Grand Prix – the first of his record 91 Formula One wins.

20 years ago (13 Aug 1997)
The first episode of the adult animated comedy series South Park was broadcast on Comedy Central in the USA.

20 years ago (26 Aug 1997)
The first DVD-Video discs went on sale in the USA.

20 years ago (29 Aug 1997)
Netflix began operating as an online DVD rental service. It switched to a subscription-based service in 1999 and later added unlimited video streaming and original programming.

20 years ago (31 Aug 1997)
Death of Diana, Princess of Wales, her companion Dodi Fayed, and their driver, in a car crash in the Place de l’Alma underpass in Paris, France.

15 years ago (4 Aug 2002)
Soham murders, Cambridgeshire, UK. 10-year-old schoolgirls Jessica Chapman and Holly Wells went missing. (Their bodies were found in a ditch in Suffolk 2 weeks later. School caretaker Ian Huntley and his girlfriend Maxine Carr were arrested and convicted.)


Become a lifetime member of ideas4writers
and get ALL 40 of our ebooks
(including The Date-A-Base Book 2017 and
Next Year’s News 2018) for just £49.95!

(or the equivalent in your local currency)

Price if purchased individually: £214.56
Save: £164.61

Click here to find out more or email us to ask a question

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Next Year’s News: 50 Newsworthy Anniversaries in July 2017 for you to write about

Monday, 16 January 2017

Here are 50 newsworthy anniversaries coming up in July 2017 for you to write about (and make money from). The anniversaries are listed 6 months in advance to give you enough time to find markets, and research and write your articles.

We have painstakingly cross-checked every entry, but you are advised to check all facts again as part of your research. Please let us know of any errors you find.


The Date-A-Base Book 2017The listing below is a small sample of the entries for July from The Date-A-Base Book 2017
There are 306 anniversaries for July in the book (more than six times more than listed here). The book covers the whole of 2017 from January to December and features more than 4,000 anniversaries in total.

If you need to work further ahead, Next Year’s News 2018 (the new name for the Date-A-Base Book series) is also available!

Just one published article should cover the cost of your copy many times over – and the book also explains how to get your anniversary articles and features published in newspapers and magazines, on radio and TV, and on paid sites online.

300 years ago (17 Jul 1717)
Handel’s Water Music was performed for the first time, on a barge on the River Thames in London. King George I sailed in the royal barge to hear the music, and was accompanied by many Londoners in their own boats.

250 years ago (11 Jul 1767)
Birth of John Quincy Adams, 6th President of the United States (1825-–29).

200 years ago (12 Jul 1817)
Birth of Henry David Thoreau, American essayist, poet, philosopher and advocate of civil liberties. A leading transcendentalist. Best known for his book Walden (a record of his experiment in simple living) and for his essay Civil Disobedience.

200 years ago (18 Jul 1817)
Death of Jane Austen, British romantic novelist. One of the most widely read writers in English literature. She helped set the character of the modern novel. Her books include Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Emma, Northanger Abbey and Persuasion.

150 years ago (1 Jul 1867)
The Dominion of Canada was established when the British North America Act (also known as Constitution Act of 1867) came into effect. It was comprised of 4 provinces: Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Quebec and Ontario. (The event is now celebrated annually in Canada as Canada Day.)

150 years ago (5 Jul 1867)
Birth of A. E. Douglass, American astronomer and archaeologist. Founder of the field of dendrochronology (dating past events by analysing the ring growth patterns in trees). He also discovered a correlation between the sunspot cycle and tree rings.

150 years ago (24 Jul 1867)
Birth of E. F. Benson, British novelist, short story writer, biographer and memoirist. Best known for his novels featuring the characters Mapp and Lucia.

150 years ago (26 Jul 1867)
Death of Otto, first King of modern Greece (1832–-62).

150 years ago (31 Jul 1867)
Birth of S. S. Kresge, American merchant who founded a chain of discount stores which later became Kmart.

125 years ago (18 Jul 1892)
Death of Thomas Cook, pioneering British travel agent. Founder of Thomas Cook & Son. Regarded as the inventor of modern tourism.

100 years ago (7 Jul 1917)
World War I: the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC) was founded in the UK. For the first time, women were able to enlist in the Army and serve alongside their male counterparts in France (in non-combat roles).

100 years ago (16 – 20 Jul 1917)
Russian Revolution – the July Days demonstrations, Petrograd. The Russian military attacked peaceful demonstrations by soldiers and industrial workers who were protesting against the Russian Provisional Government. Provisional Prime Minister Georgy Lvov resigned on 21st July and was succeeded by Alexander Kerensky (until 7th November when he was also overthrown in the October Revolution).

100 years ago (17 Jul 1917)
World War I: King George V changed the name of the British royal family from Saxe-Coburg and Gotha to Windsor (due to the anti-German sentiment in Britain ).

100 years ago (20 Jul 1917)
World War I: the first military draft lottery was held in the USA to select the order in which men would be called for service in WWI. 1,374,000 men were selected for examination, of whom 687,000 were called for immediate service. A further 10 million men were listed for future service.

100 years ago (24 Jul 1917)
World War I: Dutch-born exotic dancer Mata Hari went on trial in France, accused of spying for Germany. She was convicted and sentenced to death. (Executed: 15th October 1917.)

100 years ago (27 Jul 1917)
Death of Emil Theodor Kocher, pioneering Swiss surgeon. Winner of the 1909 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for his work on the thyroid gland. He also made several other important contributions to surgery, promoted aseptic surgery and scientific methods, reduced mortality from surgery, and invented new techniques, instruments and appliances.

100 years ago (31 Jul – 10 Nov 1917)
World War I – the Battle of Passchendaele (also known as the Third Battle of Ypres), Belgium. One of the greatest disasters of the war for both sides. Casualty figures were enormous, but the Allies were better able to bear the heavy losses as the war continued.

80 years ago (5 Jul 1937)
SPAM luncheon meat was launched by Hormel Foods in Austin, Minnesota, USA.

80 years ago (7 – 9 Jul 1937)
The Second Sino-Japanese War began with the Marco Polo Bridge Incident (the Battle of Lugou Bridge). Japanese troops made an assault on an important access point to the city of Beijing, China. This developed into a full-scale war, and then into the Pacific theatre of war during WWII, which continued until 1945.

75 years ago (1 – 27 Jul 1942)
World War II – the First Battle of El Alamein, Egypt. The Allies prevented the Germans and Italians from advancing into Egypt.

75 years ago (4 Jul 1942)
World War II: the Siege of Sevastopol ended. Axis forces captured the Crimean port city which they had first attacked in October 1941.

75 years ago (6 Jul 1942)
Jewish diarist Anne Frank and her family went into hiding in a secret annex at her father’s workplace in Amsterdam.

75 years ago (10 Jul 1942)
Birth of Ronnie James Dio, American heavy metal singer and songwriter (Rainbow, Black Sabbath, Dio). Known for his powerful, soaring voice and theatrical stage persona. He also popularised the ‘devil horns’ hand gesture. (Died 2010.)

75 years ago (17 Jul 1942 – Feb 1943)
World War II – the Battle of Stalingrad. Soviet victory.

75 years ago (23 Jul 1942)
Holocaust: the Treblinka extermination camp in Poland began operating. (By October 1943 around 850,000 people had been killed there by gassing.)

75 years ago (31 Jul 1942)
The charity Oxfam was founded in the UK (as the Oxford Committee for Famine Relief).

70 years ago (2 Jul 1947)
The Roswell Incident, New Mexico, USA. A UFO apparently crash-landed on a ranch, and debris with strange markings and unusual properties was found. The U.S. Air Force claimed it was just a weather balloon. Some witnesses reported seeing the bodies of aliens, which the Air Force later said were mannequins.

70 years ago (9 Jul 1947)
Florence Blanchfield was appointed a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Army, becoming the first woman in the USA to hold permanent military rank.

70 years ago (11 Jul 1947)
Exodus 1947. The ship SS Exodus carrying illegal Jewish emigrants from France set sail for the British Mandate of Palestine. Many of the passengers were Holocaust survivors. On arrival, the British packed them into 3 ships and deported them (on 19th July) back to France. On reaching Marseilles (on 2nd August), they refused to leave the ships and were taken to Germany where they were held in poor conditions in refugee camps. The event was widely covered in the media and caused Britain significant embarrassment. (About half the emigrants ended up in detainment camps in Cyprus when they tried to make the journey again. Britain recognised Israel in January 1949 and the detainees were transferred there.)

70 years ago (26 Jul 1947)
U.S. President Harry S. Truman signed the National Security Act into law. It led to the creation of the Department of Defense, the National Military Establishment, the National Security Council, the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and separated the Army Air Forces into its own service – the Department of the Air Force. (Effective from 18th September 1947.)

60 years ago (6 Jul 1957)
American tennis player Althea Gibson became the first black player to win a Wimbledon singles title.

60 years ago (6 Jul 1957)
John Lennon and Paul McCartney met for the first time at a church hall in Liverpool, England, where 16-year-old Lennon was performing with his skiffle group, the Quarrymen. 15-year-old McCartney joined as a rhythm guitarist shortly afterwards, and the pair went on to form the Beatles.

60 years ago (12 Jul 1957)
The Sodium Reactor Experiment, the first nuclear reactor in the USA to generate electricity for the commercial power grid, began operating in Simi Valley, California. It produced power for Los Angeles. (It experienced a partial meltdown in July 1959. It was restarted in September 1960, and shut down in February 1964. Removal of the reactor was completed in 1981.)

60 years ago (29 Jul 1957)
The International Atomic Energy Agency was established. It promotes the peaceful use of nuclear energy.

50 years ago (1 Jul 1967)
The European Economic Community, the European Coal and Steel Community and the European Atomic Energy Community merged into a single organisation. Many people regard this event as the creation of the European Union.

50 years ago (1 Jul 1967)
BBC2 became the first TV channel in Europe to broadcast regularly in colour.

50 years ago (5 Jul 1967)
Israel annexed the Gaza Strip following the Six-Day War. (Israel officially withdrew from Gaza in September 2005, but as it continues to control the airspace and coastline it is still regarded as an occupying power by the UN.)

50 years ago (6 Jul 1967 – 15 Jan 1970)
Nigerian Civil War (also known as the Biafran War). Nigerian government forces invaded the breakaway Republic of Biafra which had seceded in May. Nigerian victory: Biafra was reintegrated into Nigeria.

50 years ago (8 Jul 1967)
Death of Vivien Leigh, award-winning Indian-born British stage and film actress (Gone with the Wind, A Streetcar Named Desire and more).

50 years ago (21 Jul 1967)
Death of Basil Rathbone, Tony Award-winning South African-born British stage, film and radio actor. Best known for his role as Sherlock Holmes.

50 years ago (27 Jul 1967)
The Criminal Justice Act 1967 received Royal Assent in England and Wales. It allowed majority verdicts for juries in criminal trials, removing the need for unanimous verdicts. (The first case in the UK to be decided by a majority verdict was in Brighton on 5th October 1967.)

50 years ago (27 Jul 1967)
The Sexual Offences Act received Royal Assent in England and Wales (but excluded the Merchant Navy and Armed Forces). It decriminalised homosexual acts in private between consenting males aged 21 or over.

40 years ago (1 Jul 1977)
British tennis player Virginia Wade won the ladies’ singles championship at Wimbledon. (She remains the last British woman to do so.)

30 years ago (29 Jul 1987)
British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and French President François Mitterrand ratified the Treaty of Canterbury – the agreement to build the Channel Tunnel. (Construction began on 15th December.)

20 years ago (1 Jul 1997)
The sovereignty of Hong Kong was transferred from the UK to China.

20 years ago (1 Jul 1997)
The entertainment television network MTV UK & Ireland was launched.

20 years ago (9 Jul 1997)
The CEO of Apple Computer, Gil Amelio, was forced to resign following a boardroom coup led by Steve Jobs. The coup followed heavy financial losses and a slump in shares. (Jobs became interim CEO in September and began restructuring the company.)

20 years ago (15 Jul 1997)
Death of Gianni Versace, Italian fashion designer. (Shot dead by American serial killer Andrew Cunanan, who killed himself on 23rd July.)

20 years ago (20 Jul 1997)
The second IRA ceasefire in 3 years came into effect in Northern Ireland. There were sporadic outbreaks of violence afterwards, but the ceasefire lasted, leading to the signing of the Good Friday Agreement in May 1998.

10 years ago (1 Jul 2007)
Smoking was banned in all enclosed workplaces in England. Similar bans were already in place in Scotland (26th March 2006), Wales (2nd April 2007) and Northern Ireland (30th April 2007).


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Next Year’s News: 50 Newsworthy Anniversaries in June 2017 for you to write about

Monday, 19 December 2016

Here are 50 newsworthy anniversaries coming up in June 2017 for you to write about (and make money from). The anniversaries are listed 6 months in advance to give you enough time to find markets, and research and write your articles.

We have painstakingly cross-checked every entry, but you are advised to check all facts again as part of your research. Please let us know of any errors you find.


The Date-A-Base Book 2017The listing below is a small sample of the entries for June from The Date-A-Base Book 2017
There are 326 anniversaries for June in the book (more than six times more than listed here). The book covers the whole of 2017 from January to December and features more than 4,000 anniversaries in total.

If you need to work further ahead, Next Year’s News 2018 (the new name for the Date-A-Base Book series) is also available!

Just one published article should cover the cost of your copy many times over – and the book also explains how to get your articles published.

1000 years ago (5 Jun 1017)
Death of Sanjo, Emperor of Japan (1011-16).

500 years ago (18 Jun 1517)
Birth of Ogimachi, Emperor of Japan (1557-86).

300 years ago (24 Jun 1717)
Freemasonry: the first Grand Lodge was founded in London. (It is now the United Grand Lodge of England.)

200 years ago (26 Jun 1817)
Birth of Branwell Brontë, British artist, writer and poet. Brother of the writers Charlotte, Emily and Anne Brontë.

200 years ago (30 Jun 1817)
Birth of Sir Joseph Hooker, British botanist. One of the greatest British botanists and explorers of the 19th century. Director of the Royal Botanical Gardens, Kew (1865-85). He was also a close friend of Charles Darwin and encouraged his work.

150 years ago (8 Jun 1867)
Birth of Frank Lloyd Wright, famous American architect.

150 years ago (17 Jun 1867)
Birth of John Robert Gregg, Irish-born American publisher who developed Gregg Shorthand – the most popular form of shorthand in the USA.

125 years ago (3 Jun 1892)
Liverpool Football Club was officially founded in England.

125 years ago (6 Jun 1892)
The Chicago ‘L’ rapid transit system began operating in Illinois. It is one of the largest and busiest city transit systems in the USA.

100 years ago (4 Jun 1917)
The Order of the British Empire was established by King George V. It is an order of chivalry awarded to people who make a significant achievement for (or contribution to) the United Kingdom. There are 5 classes: Knight/Dame Grand Cross (GBE), Knight/Dame Commander (KBE/DBE), Commander (CBE), Officer (OBE), Member (MBE).

100 years ago (4 Jun 1917)
The first Pulitzer Prizes were awarded.

100 years ago (5 Jun 1917)
World War I: the first WWI draft registration day was held in the USA. About 10 million men aged 21 – 31 registered for military service. Registration was compulsory. (By the end of the war in 1918 about 2.8 million American men had been drafted, and a further 2 million had joined the armed forces as volunteers.)

100 years ago (7 Jun 1917)
Lions Clubs International was founded.

100 years ago (11 Jun 1917)
Alexander I became King of Greece following his father Constantine I’s abdication. (Constantine went into exile in Switzerland.)

100 years ago (13 Jun 1917)
World War I: Germany carried out its deadliest air raid of the war. Gotha G.IV heavy bombers attacked London, killing 162 people and injuring 432. One of the bombs fell on a primary school in Poplar, where 16 children were killed.

100 years ago (15 Jun 1917)
Death of Kristian Birkeland, Norwegian physicist, astrophysicist, educator and explorer. Known as ‘the first space scientist’. Best known as the first person to determine the nature of the aurora borealis. He also invented a process for fixing nitrogen from the air (the Birkeland–Eyde process) and made numerous other contributions to science. He was nominated for a Nobel Prize 7 times, but never won.

100 years ago (17 Jun 1917?)
Birth of Dean Martin, (‘the King of Cool’), popular American stage, film and television singer, actor and comedian. A member of the Rat Pack. Noted for his seemingly effortless charisma and performances. Well known for his comedy partnership with Jerry Lewis. He also hosted the TV series The Dean Martin Show and The Dean Martin Celebrity Roast. (Several sources give his date of birth as 7th June but we believe 17th is correct.)

100 years ago (23 Jun 1917)
Ukraine was founded (as the Ukrainian People’s Republic). It proclaimed independence from Russia in January 1918.

100 years ago (26 Jun 1917)
World War I: the first troops from the American Expeditionary Forces arrived in France under the command of General John Pershing. They were the first U.S. forces to fight in WWI.

80 years ago (3 Jun 1937)
Prince Edward, Duke of Windsor, formerly King Edward VIII of the United Kingdom, married Wallis Warfield in France.

80 years ago (30 Jun 1937)
The 999 emergency telephone service went into operation in London – the first such service in the world. It began operating in other major UK cities after WWII and was extended nationally in 1976.

75 years ago (1 Jun 1942)
Liberty Brigade, an underground newspaper published in Warsaw, Poland, revealed the first details of the Nazi extermination camps and the gassing of tens of thousands of Jews at Chelmno.

75 years ago (3 Jun 1942 – 15 Aug 1943)
World War II – the Aleutian Islands Campaign, Alaska, USA. Allied victory. Japanese forces occupied the islands of Attu and Kiska but were eventually ejected by a combined US/Canadian force, though this took time because of the difficult terrain and weather conditions.

75 years ago (4 – 7 Jun 1942)
World War II – the Battle of Midway. The USA defeated Japan in the most important naval battle of the Pacific Campaign.

75 years ago (4 Jun 1942)
Death of Reinhard Heydrich, German Nazi official. Heinrich Himmler’s chief lieutenant in the SS. He played a key role in organising the Holocaust, and chaired the Wannsee Conference (20th January 1942). (Assassinated. The Czech village of Lidice was destroyed on 10th June in retaliation for his death.)

75 years ago (12 Jun 1942)
Anne Frank received her famous diary for her 13th birthday. She used it to document her life over the next 2 years as her family hid from the Nazis. It was first published in the Netherlands in June 1947 (as The Secret Annex: Diary Notes from 14 June 1942 to 1 August 1944). An English translation was published in the UK and USA in 1952 (as The Diary of a Young Girl).

75 years ago (25 Jun 1942)
World War II: Major General Dwight D. Eisenhower (later U.S. President) took command of U.S. forces in Europe.

60 years ago (1 Jun 1957)
The Casio Computer Company was founded in Japan.

60 years ago (1 Jun 1957)
The first premium bond prize draw took place in Britain.

60 years ago (27 Jun 1957)
Britain’s Medical Research Council reported that there was a cause-and-effect relationship between smoking and lung cancer. As a result, the Minister of Health said he had a duty to warn the public of the risks smokers faced. (In 1954 the then Minister of Health had said there was no firm evidence of a link, only a presumption of one.)

50 years ago (1 Jun 1967)
The album Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band by the Beatles was released.

50 years ago (3 Jun 1967)
Death of Arthur Ransome, British children’s writer. Best known for his Swallows and Amazons series of 12 novels.

50 years ago (4 Jun 1967)
Stockport air disaster, Greater Manchester, England. A British Midland Airways plane crashed in an open area near the centre of Stockport after suffering fuel starvation due to a leaking valve. 72 of the 84 people on board were killed. All 12 survivors were seriously injured.

50 years ago (6 Jun 1967)
Six-Day War: Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser closed the Suez Canal by scuttling ships on both sides of it. It remained closed until 1975. 15 cargo ships (the ‘Yellow Fleet’) were trapped in the canal for 8 years.

50 years ago (7 Jun 1967)
Death of Dorothy Parker, American short story writer, poet and critic. Renowned for her witty remarks. She was also blacklisted by Hollywood for her involvement in left-wing politics.

50 years ago (10 Jun 1967)
Death of Spencer Tracy, Academy Award-winning American actor. One of the greatest male leads during Hollywood’s Golden Age. His films include Father of the Bride, Bad Day at Black Rock, Inherit the Wind, Judgement at Nuremberg, How the West Was Won, It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World, Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner and many more.

50 years ago (12 Jun 1967)
The Soviet Union launched its Venera 4 spacecraft on a mission to Venus. It became the first craft to enter another planet’s atmosphere and return data. It found that Venus’s atmosphere was extremely hot and far denser than expected. It might also have been the first spacecraft to land on another planet. (Venera 3 might have been the first – it possibly crash-landed on Venus in March 1966, but its communications system failed before it reached the planet and its fate is unknown. The first successful landing on Venus was achieved by Venera 7 in 1970.)

50 years ago (16 Jun 1967 to 18th)
The Monterey Pop Festival was held in California, USA. It featured the first major U.S. public appearances by Jimi Hendrix, The Who, Ravi Shankar, Janis Joplin, and Otis Redding. It also inspired the Woodstock Festival held in 1969. (Jimi Hendrix famously set fire to his guitar on stage at this event – an act he had first performed in London on 31st March.)

50 years ago (20 Jun 1967)
American world heavyweight boxing champion Muhammad Ali was convicted of violating Selective Service laws by refusing to be drafted into the U.S. Army. His conviction was overturned by the Supreme Court in 1971, but it left him unable to box between the ages of 25 and 29 – what should have been the peak of his career.

50 years ago (27 Jun 1967)
The world’s first ATM (cash machine) went into operation at Barclays Bank in Enfield, north London, UK. Comedy actor Reg Varney made the first withdrawal.

50 years ago (29 Jun 1967)
Death of Jayne Mansfield, award-winning American stage and film actress. One of Hollywood’s leading blonde bombshells of the 1950s. (Car crash.)

40 years ago (10 Jun 1977)
Apple Computer released the Apple II – the first personal computer to feature colour graphics. It cost $1,298 (£835).

40 years ago (16 Jun 1977)
Leonid Brezhnev became Chairman of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet of the Soviet Union (equivalent to ceremonial head of state). He held the position until his death in November 1982.

40 years ago (26 Jun 1977)
Elvis Presley performed his last concert, in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA.

30 years ago (12 Jun 1987)
During a visit to Berlin, Germany to celebrate the city’s 750th anniversary, U.S. President Ronald Reagan gave a historic speech in front of the Berlin wall, challenging Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev to ‘tear down this wall’. (The wall was demolished in November 1989.)

25 years ago (17 Jun 1992)
START II arms reduction treaty: U.S. President George H. W. Bush and Russian President Boris Yeltsin attended two arms reduction summit meetings where the treaty was agreed. (The first meeting was held in Washington, D.C. on this day and the second was held in Moscow in January 1993.)

25 years ago (22 Jun 1992)
Andrew Morton’s controversial book Diana: Her True Story was published. It claimed that Diana, Princess of Wales was deeply depressed and unstable and had attempted suicide a number of times.

20 years ago (12 Jun 1997)
Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre opened in London. It is a reconstruction of the original theatre of 1599, located about 750 feet (230 metres) from the original site. The project to rebuild it began in 1970 and was led by the actor and director Sam Wanamaker (who died in 1993).

20 years ago (25 Jun 1997)
The Soufrière Hills volcano on Montserrat erupted, killing 19 people. Over the next few months it destroyed the capital, Plymouth, and rendered half the island uninhabitable. About two-thirds of the population have been evacuated. (At the time of writing it is still erupting.)

20 years ago (26 Jun 1997)
The first Harry Potter novel, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone by J. K. Rowling, was published in the UK. (USA: September 1998 as Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone.)

10 years ago (29 Jun 2007)
Apple released the first iPhone.


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Price if purchased individually: £214.56
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Available now: Next Year’s News 2018

Tuesday, 22 November 2016

Next Year's News 2018Next Year’s News is the new name for our popular “The Date-A-Base Book” series.

Inside you’ll find details of over 5,000 newsworthy and notable anniversaries in 2018, including events, discoveries, inventions, births and deaths.

It’s the ideal (some would say essential!) reference for all writers, journalists, researchers, TV/radio producers and film-makers.

 

Size: 8.5″ x 11.5″. 357 pages.

The ebook (PDF) version is available now. Printed copies will be available in January.

The price is unchanged from last year: £9.99 (US$12.49).

Get your copy now at www.ideas4writers.co.uk/2018

The Date-A-Base Book 2017 is also available.

ideas4writers lifetime members: this ebook is included in your membership. You can download it from the members’ home page after logging in at www.ideas4writers.co.uk.

Next Year’s News: 50 Newsworthy Anniversaries in April 2017 for you to write about

Tuesday, 18 October 2016

Here are 50 newsworthy anniversaries coming up in April 2017 for you to write about (and make money from). The anniversaries are listed 6 months in advance to give you enough time to find markets, and research and write your articles.

We have painstakingly cross-checked every entry, but you are advised to check all facts again as part of your research. Please let us know of any errors you find.


The Date-A-Base Book 2016The listing below is a small sample of the entries for April from The Date-A-Base Book 2017
There are 322 anniversaries for April in the book (more than six times more than listed here). The book covers the whole of 2017 from January to December and features more than 4,000 anniversaries in total.

Just one published article should cover the cost of your copy many times over – and the book also explains how to get your articles published.

200 years ago (12 Apr 1817)
Death of Charles Messier, French astronomer. Best known for publishing the first systematic catalogue of diffuse (or ‘blurry’) celestial light sources – which we now know as galaxies, star clusters and nebulae.

200 years ago (15 Apr 1817)
The first school for the deaf in the USA was founded: the Hartford Asylum for the Education and Instruction of the Deaf and Dumb (now the American School for the Deaf), in Hartford, Connecticut.

150 years ago (10 Apr 1867)
Birth of George William Russell, (‘AE’), Irish nationalist, poet, artist and mystic.

150 years ago (16 Apr 1867)
Birth of Wilbur Wright, American aviation pioneer (Wright brothers) who achieved the first powered, sustained and controlled plane flight.

125 years ago (8 Apr 1892?)
Birth of Mary Pickford, (‘America’s Sweetheart’), pioneering Canadian-born American film actress. One of the first film stars in the USA. Co-founder of United Artists film studio and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. (Britannica gives her year of birth as 1893, but this appears to be incorrect.)

125 years ago (13 Apr 1892)
Birth of Sir Robert Watson-Watt, Scottish physicist who developed radar.

125 years ago (15 Apr 1892)
General Electric was founded in the USA when the Edison General Electric Company and the Thomson-Houston Company merged.

125 years ago (15 Apr 1892)
Birth of Corrie ten Boom, Dutch writer and speaker. Best known for helping many Jews escape the Holocaust during WWII. She also established a rehabilitation shelter for concentration camp survivors.

100 years ago (1 Apr 1917)
The Danish West Indies were officially transferred to the USA and renamed the United States Virgin Islands, after the USA purchased them from Denmark for $25 million (£16 million).

100 years ago (1 Apr 1917)
Death of Scott Joplin, (‘king of ragtime’), American composer and pianist. Known for his ragtime pieces including Maple Leaf Rag and The Entertainer. (Died from syphilitic dementia in a mental institution.) Posthumously awarded the Pulitzer Prize.

100 years ago (6 Apr 1917)
World War I: the USA declared war on Germany and entered the war.

100 years ago (14 Apr 1917)
Death of L. L. Zamenhof, Polish physician and linguist who created Esperanto.

100 years ago (16 Apr 1917)
Birth of Barry Nelson, American film and television actor. The first actor to play James Bond on screen (in a 1954 adaptation of Casino Royale on the TV anthology series Climax!). He also appeared in the films Airport, The Shining and more. (Died 2007.)

100 years ago (25 Apr 1917)
Birth of Ella Fitzgerald, world famous American jazz singer.

80 years ago (17 Apr 1937)
Daffy Duck made his debut appearance in the Warner Brothers’ cartoon Porky’s Duck Hunt.

80 years ago (26 Apr 1937)
Spanish Civil War: German planes bombed the Basque town of Guernica.

80 years ago (27 Apr 1937)
The National Maritime Museum in Greenwich, London opened.

75 years ago (8 Apr 1942 – Nov 1945)
World War II – the Hump. Allied pilots carried out a daily airlift of supplies into China from India after Axis forces blocked supply routes including the Burma Road. They resupplied the Chinese war effort as well as U.S. Army Air Force units stationed in China. They were forced to fly a challenging route over the eastern end of the Himalayas – which they nicknamed ‘the Hump’. 594 aircraft were lost or irreparably damaged during the mission and 1,659 personnel were killed.

75 years ago (9 Apr 1942)
World War II: the Bataan Death March. The Japanese forced 75,000 captured Philippines and American troops to march for 6 days without food or water to a prisoner-of-war camp. Thousands died.

75 years ago (15 Apr 1942)
World War II: Britain awarded the George Cross to the island of Malta in recognition of the bravery of its people.

75 years ago (23 Apr – 6 Jun 1942)
World War II: Germany launched the ‘Baedeker Blitz’ in retaliation for the bombing of the city of Lübeck. They planned to bomb every building in Britain that scored 3 stars in the Baedeker tourist guide. Exeter, Bath, Norwich, York and Canterbury were the main targets.

75 years ago (24 Apr 1942)
Death of Lucy Maud Montgomery, Canadian romantic novelist. Best known for Anne of Green Gables.

75 years ago (26 Apr 1942)
The worst mining disaster in history. An explosion at the Honkeiko (also known as Benxihu) colliery in Benxi, China killed 1,549 miners.

70 years ago (6 Apr 1947)
The first Tony Awards were presented, at the Waldorf Astoria hotel, New York City, USA.

70 years ago (15 Apr 1947)
Jackie Robinson became the first African American to play major league baseball. He played for the Brooklyn Dodgers, ending the racial segregation that had relegated black players to the Negro leagues.

60 years ago (1 Apr 1957)
The BBC TV current affairs programme Panorama broadcast its famous April Fool’s Day ‘spaghetti tree’ hoax.

60 years ago (24 Apr 1957)
The first episode of the British astronomy programme The Sky at Night was broadcast on BBC TV. It became the world’s longest-running television programme with the same presenter (Patrick Moore) until his death in December 2012. (His final appearance was in the January 2013 episode, which was pre-recorded. The programme continues with new presenters.)

50 years ago (8 Apr 1967)
The United Kingdom won the Eurovision Song Contest for the first time, with the song Puppet on a String sung by Sandie Shaw. The contest was held in Vienna, Austria.

50 years ago (28 Apr 1967)
American world heavyweight boxing champion Muhammad Ali refused to be inducted into the U.S. Army after being drafted to fight in the Vietnam War. He was arrested, his boxing license suspended, and he was stripped of his title. He was found guilty at a trial held on 20th June. As he was unable to box, he spent the time giving inspirational speeches at schools and colleges. (The Supreme Court overturned the decision in June 1971, but he had lost 4 years’ boxing time when he would have been at the prime of his career. He became world heavyweight champion again in 1974 and 1978.)

40 years ago (2 Apr 1977)
British race horse Red Rum won the Grand National for a historic third time. It is considered one of the greatest moments in sporting history, and the record still stands today.

30 years ago (1 Apr 1987)
U.S. President Ronald Reagan declared AIDS ‘public health enemy No. 1’’.

30 years ago (19 Apr 1987)
The Simpsons was first broadcast as a cartoon short on The Tracey Ullman Show in the USA.

25 years ago (2 Apr 1992)
American Mafia boss John Gotti was convicted of 13 counts of murder, racketeering and obstruction of justice. (On 23rd June he was sentenced to life imprisonment. He died in 2002.)

25 years ago (5 Apr 1992)
Death of Sam Walton, American retail executive. Founder of Wal-Mart – the world’s largest company (by revenue).

25 years ago (6 Apr 1992 – Dec 1995)
The Bosnian War. Result: military stalemate and the internal partition of Bosnia and Herzegovina according to the Dayton Accords.

25 years ago (6 Apr 1992)
Microsoft released its Windows 3.1 graphical operating environment. This version introduced TrueType fonts and the famous Control-Alt-Delete command (also known as the ‘three finger salute’). It also allowed users to copy and paste data between different applications.

25 years ago (6 Apr 1992)
Death of Isaac Asimov, prolific Russian-born American writer and biochemist. Known for his hugely successful science fiction stories and popular science books.

25 years ago (9 Apr 1992)
Former Panamanian leader Manuel Noriega was convicted of drug trafficking, racketeering and money laundering at a court in Miami, Florida, USA. (Sentenced to 40 years in prison – later reduced to 30. After his release in 2007 he was extradited to France, retried, and sentenced to 7 years. In 2011 he was extradited to Panama and sentenced to 20 years.)

25 years ago (9 Apr 1992)
British general election. The Conservative Party won a fourth consecutive term in power, confounding expectations.

25 years ago (10 Apr 1992)
Baltic Exchange bombing, 30 St. Mary Axe, London. A one-ton IRA truck bomb exploded outside the Baltic Exchange, destroying part of the façade and damaging the rest of the building and surrounding buildings – cost of damage £800 million. 3 people were killed and 91 injured. (English Heritage wanted the building restored but, upon learning that the damage was far more severe than initially thought, it was demolished in 1998. The ‘Gherkin’ skyscraper now stands in its place.)

25 years ago (12 Apr 1992)
Disneyland Paris (formerly known as Euro Disney) opened in France.

25 years ago (18 Apr 1992?)
Death of Benny Hill, British comedian and actor. Best known for The Benny Hill Show. (Found dead on 20th April but probably died two days earlier.)

25 years ago (19 Apr 1992)
Death of Frankie Howerd, British comedian and comic actor. Known for the stage show A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum and the TV series Up Pompeii!, and as a member of the Carry On… team.

25 years ago (20 Apr 1992)
The Freddie Mercury Tribute Concert for AIDS Awareness was held at Wembley Stadium in London. It was a tribute to the Queen singer who died in November 1991, with all proceeds going to AIDS research.

25 years ago (27 Apr 1992)
Betty Boothroyd became the first female Speaker of Britain’s House of Commons.

25 years ago (29 Apr 1992)
Los Angeles riots, California, USA. A jury acquitted four police officers of the (videotaped) beating of African American motorist Rodney King, sparking six days of riots in which 53 people were killed.

20 years ago (29 Apr 1997)
The Chemical Weapons Convention came into effect, banning their use, development, manufacture, stockpiling, and sale or transfer. (Angola, Egypt, North Korea and South Sudan are the only countries that have not signed the convention. Israel and Myanmar have signed but not ratified it.)

20 years ago (30 Apr 1997)
The famous ‘coming out’ episode of the sitcom Ellen was broadcast on ABC TV in the USA. The title character, played by Ellen DeGeneres, admitted that she was a lesbian.

10 years ago (4 Apr 2007)
The first Earth-like exoplanet, Gliese 581 c, was discovered by astronomers at the European Southern Observatory in Chile. It is 20.5 light years away, in the constellation Libra and has a mass 5.5 times that of the Earth. (In April 2009 another planet in that system, Gliese 581 e, was discovered with a mass 1.9 times that of the Earth.)

10 years ago (16 Apr 2007)
Virginia Tech shooting, Blacksburg, Virginia, USA. Seung-Hui Cho, a senior student diagnosed with a severe anxiety disorder, shot and killed 32 people and wounded 17 others (6 more were injured when they jumped out of windows to escape). He then committed suicide. It is the deadliest shooting incident by a single gunman in U.S. history.


Become a lifetime member of ideas4writers
and get ALL 40 of our ebooks
(including The Date-A-Base Book 2017 and the exclusive 2018 preview) for just £49.95!

(or the equivalent in your local currency)

Price if purchased individually: £214.56
Save: £164.61

Click here to find out more or email us to ask a question

ideas4writers: inspiring you since 2002

Next Year’s News: 50 Newsworthy Anniversaries in March 2017 for you to write about

Monday, 19 September 2016

Here are 50 newsworthy anniversaries coming up in March 2017 for you to write about (and make money from). The anniversaries are listed 6 months in advance to give you enough time to find markets, and research and write your articles.

For more details about how to do this, download our free booklet:
Ditch Your Day Job – the easiest way to make a living as a writer.

We have painstakingly cross-checked every entry, but you are advised to check all facts again as part of your research. Please let us know of any errors you find.


The Date-A-Base Book 2016The listing below is a small sample of the entries for March from The Date-A-Base Book 2017
There are 357 anniversaries for March in the book (more than seven times more than are listed here). The book covers the whole of 2017 from January to December and features more than 4,000 anniversaries in total.

Just one published article should cover the cost of your copy many times over – and the book also explains how to get your articles published.

400 years ago (21 Mar 1617?)
Death of Pocahontas, Native American daughter of Powhatan, paramount chief of the tribal nations in the Tsenacommacah, Virginia. She was captured by English settlers and held for ransom, but chose to stay with them and convert to Christianity rather than return to her own people. She married an English tobacco planter and moved to England with him. (Her funeral took place on this date, but her date of death is uncertain.)

300 years ago (2 Mar 1717)
The first ballet to be performed in England: The Loves of Mars and Venus by John Weaver, at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, London.

250 years ago (15 Mar 1767)
Birth of Andrew Jackson, 7th President of the United States.

200 years ago (4 Mar 1817)
James Monroe was inaugurated as the 5th President of the United States. He was the last president who was also a founding father.

200 years ago (8 Mar 1817)
The New York Stock Exchange was founded.

150 years ago (1 Mar 1867)
Nebraska became the 37th state of the USA.

150 years ago (2 Mar 1867)
The U.S. Congress passed the first Reconstruction Act (of four) following the end of the U.S. Civil War. States which had seceded from the Union had to meet the conditions of the Act before they would be readmitted.

150 years ago (5 Mar 1867)
Fenian Rising: failed Fenian uprisings against English rule took place in Cork, Limerick and Dublin, Ireland. 12 people were killed.

150 years ago (16 Mar 1867)
British surgeon Joseph Lister published the first article outlining his discovery of antiseptic surgery, in the medical journal The Lancet. He explained how his use of carbolic acid (now known as phenol) to sterilise instruments and clean wounds had significantly reduced infections.

150 years ago (21 Mar 1867)
Birth of Florenz Ziegfeld, American theatrical producer. Best known for the Ziegfeld Follies revue show, as well as a string of successful Broadway shows including Show Boat.

150 years ago (25 Mar 1867)
Birth of Arturo Toscanini, acclaimed Italian conductor.

150 years ago (30 Mar 1867)
The USA purchased Alaska from the Russian Empire for $7.2 million (£4.6 million) – about 2 cents per acre. (It became a U.S. state in 1959.)

100 years ago (2 Mar 1917)
The people of Puerto Rico were granted U.S. citizenship when U.S. President Woodrow Wilson signed the Jones-Shafroth Act into effect.

100 years ago (2 Mar 1917)
Birth of Desi Arnaz, Cuban-born American bandleader, musician, actor and television producer. Husband of the actress Lucille Ball. Best known for his role as Ricky Ricardo in the TV sitcom I Love Lucy, and for his internationally acclaimed Latin music band, the Desi Arnaz Orchestra.

100 years ago (4 Mar 1917)
Jeannette Rankin from Montana took office as the first woman elected to the U.S. Congress.

100 years ago (6 Mar 1917)
Birth of Frankie Howerd, British comedian and comic actor. Best known for the stage show A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum and the TV series Up Pompeii!, and as a member of the Carry On… team.

100 years ago (7 Mar 1917)
The world’s first jazz record was released: Livery Stable Blues by the Original Dixieland Jass Band. (The spelling of jass was changed to jazz later that year.)

100 years ago (8 – 12 Mar 1917)
The February Revolution, Petrograd (now St. Petersburg), Russia. This resulted in Tsar Nicholas II’s abdication (on 15th) and the end of the Russian Empire as Russia became a republic. (It is known as the February Revolution because Russia was still using the Julian calendar, under which the dates were 23rd – 27th February 1917.)

100 years ago (8 Mar 1917)
Death of Ferdinand, Graf von Zeppelin, German rigid airship manufacturer. Founder of the Zeppelin airship company.

100 years ago (16 – 18 Mar 1917)
World War I: Germany sank 3 U.S. ships in the Atlantic without warning: the SS Vigilancia, the SS City of Memphis and the tanker Illinois. On 2nd April U.S. President Woodrow Wilson declared that enough was enough and asked Congress for a declaration of war against Germany, which was granted on 6th April.

100 years ago (27 Mar 1917)
Birth of Cyrus Vance, U.S. Secretary of State (1977-–80).

100 years ago (31 Mar 1917)
The USA formally took possession of the Danish West Indies, which it purchased from Denmark under the Treaty of the Danish West Indies. The territory was renamed the U.S. Virgin Islands.

80 years ago (15 Mar 1937)
The first blood bank in the USA was established by Bernard Fantus at Cook County Hospital, Chicago, Illinois. (The world’s first blood bank was established in the Soviet Union in 1930.)

75 years ago (8 Mar 1942)
World War II: Dutch forces on Java surrendered to the Japanese.

75 years ago (8 Mar 1942)
World War II: the Bombing of Essen (Germany). The first attack on a German city by the British RAF following the Area Bombing Directive (14th February 1942) which authorised the bombing of civilian areas. A small number of houses were damaged or destroyed and 10 people were killed. (There were larger raids over the following two nights and later in the month.)

75 years ago (12 Mar 1942 – or 9th?)
Death of Robert Bosch, German engineer and industrialist. Founder of the Bosch company which developed the spark plug and magneto and later became one of the world’s largest engineering and electronics companies.

75 years ago (14 Mar 1942)
The first successful use of penicillin to treat a patient. Anne Miller, who was dying of streptococcal septicaemia, was given an injection of penicillin by doctors Orvan Hess and John Bumstead at Yale-New Haven Hospital, Connecticut, USA. She showed signs of improvement within 24 hours and made a full recovery. (Her treatment used up half of the USA’s entire stock of penicillin.)

75 years ago (16 Mar – 1 Apr 1942)
Holocaust: the Nazis began exterminating Jews in gas chambers. 15,000 Jews from the Lwów Ghetto in Poland (now Lviv, Ukraine) were transported by train to Belzec, where the first extermination camp began operating on 17th March.

75 years ago (19 Mar 1942)
The Thoroughbred Racing Associations (TRA) was established in the USA.

75 years ago (27 Mar 1942)
Capitol Records was established in Los Angeles, California, USA (as Liberty Records – it was renamed Capitol Records in May). It opened its first office on 4th June.)

60 years ago (4 Mar 1957)
The Standard & Poor 500 stock market index (commonly known as the S&P 500) was introduced.

60 years ago (6 Mar 1957)
The Gold Coast declared its independence from the UK and changed its name to Ghana. It was the first African nation to declare independence from European colonisation.

60 years ago (25 Mar 1957)
The Treaty of Rome was signed, creating the European Economic Community which was founded on 1st January 1958. (It was renamed the European Community in 1993 and was dissolved in 2009 having been replaced by the European Union).

50 years ago (6 Mar 1967)
The first North Sea gas was pumped ashore at Easington in County Durham, England. This led to a 10-year programme to convert all of the nation’s gas appliances from town gas (coal gas) to North Sea gas.

50 years ago (6 Mar 1967)
Death of Nelson Eddy, American baritone singer and actor. A crossover star of both opera and film musicals. The world’s highest-paid singer during his heyday. Best known for the films he starred in with Jeanette MacDonald, including Rose Marie, Maytime, New Moon and more. He introduced millions of young Americans to classical music and inspired many of them to take up musical careers.

50 years ago (18 Mar 1967)
Torrey Canyon oil spill, Cornwall, England. The supertanker SS Torrey Canyon hit a rock on a reef between the Cornish mainland and the Isles of Scilly while attempting to take a shortcut to South Wales. 32 million gallons of crude oil were spilled – the worst spill in UK history. Hundreds of miles of coastline were affected in the UK, France and Spain. The RAF and Royal Navy bombed the ship and attempted to set fire to the oil to burn it off, but met with limited success (25% of the bombs missed the large, stationary target). First-generation dispersal agents/detergents/solvents used on the spill were highly toxic. 15,000 sea birds were killed. The government was heavily criticised for its handling of the incident.

40 years ago (4 Mar 1977)
Vrancea earthquake (also known as the 1977 Bucharest earthquake), Eastern Carpathians. 1,578 people were killed and more than 11,300 injured, mainly in Bucharest, Romania. About 35,000 buildings were damaged, which led the Romanian government to impose stricter building standards on construction.

40 years ago (27 Mar 1977)
Tenerife airport disaster, Canary Islands. Two Boeing 747 jumbo jets collided on the runway in heavy fog. 583 people were killed – the deadliest accident in aviation history.

30 years ago (4 Mar 1987)
In a nationally televised address, U.S. President Ronald Reagan accepted full responsibility for the Iran-Contra scandal and admitted making mistakes, saying his heart and best intentions told him he did not trade arms for hostages, but the facts and evidence said he did.

30 years ago (6 Mar 1987)
The British ferry Herald of Free Enterprise capsized off Zeebrugge, Belgium after it set sail with its bow doors open. 193 people were killed.

30 years ago (19 Mar 1987)
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved AZT, a drug used in the treatment of AIDS and found to prolong the lives of patients.

25 years ago (3 Mar 1992)
Bosnia and Herzegovina declared its independence from Yugoslavia following a referendum held on 29th February and 1st March. (Independence was recognised internationally on 6th April, leading to the Bosnian War.)

25 years ago (5 Mar – 29 Apr 1992)
The trial of four Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) officers who were caught on videotape beating motorist Rodney King took place in Simi Valley, California, USA. The jury acquitted all 4 defendants of assault, acquitted 3 of them of using excessive force and could not agree a verdict of excessive force on the 4th defendant. The shock result is thought to have led to the 1992 Los Angeles riots (29th April) in which 53 people were killed.

25 years ago (9 Mar 1992)
Death of Menachem Begin, Prime Minister of Israel (1977-–83). Joint winner of the 1978 Nobel Peace Prize.

25 years ago (13 Mar 1992)
Erzincan earthquake, eastern Turkey. About 500 people were killed and 2,000 injured.

25 years ago (17 Mar 1992)
In a referendum the people of South Africa voted to back political reform and end apartheid.

20 years ago (13 Mar 1997)
The Net Book Agreement was abolished in Britain after being ruled anti-competitive by the Restrictive Practices Court. The agreement had allowed publishers to fix the price of books, preventing them from being sold at a discount. (Some retailers had deliberately damaged or defaced copies in order to sell obsolete stock at a lower price, as the agreement only covered books that were ‘new’.)

20 years ago (26 Mar 1997)
Police discovered the bodies of 39 members of the Heaven’s Gate religious cult who had committed suicide in Rancho Santa Fe, California, USA. (Cult members apparently believed this would allow their souls to reach an alien spacecraft that was following Comet Hale-Bopp, and they would then be transported to a level of existence above human.)

10 years ago (4 Mar 2007)
2007 Estonian parliamentary election. This was the world’s first nationwide election in which online voting was allowed. The incumbent Prime Minister Andrus Ansip was re-elected. 3.4% of voters (30,275 citizens) voted online.

10 years ago (31 Mar 2007)
The first Earth Hour was held in Sydney, Australia. 2.2 million participants switched off all their non-essential electric lights for 1 hour – including the floodlights on the Sydney Harbour Bridge and Opera House. In March 2008 it became a global event.


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Reviewers and bloggers wanted!

Monday, 12 September 2016

dab_cover_17We’re looking for reviewers and bloggers who would be interested in reviewing The Date-A-Base Book 2017.

The book gives details of more than 3,800 newsworthy anniversaries in 2017, including significant historic events, inventions, discoveries, births and deaths. We publish them months in advance to allow time for research, writing and editing.

We believe it’s the ideal reference/source book for writers, journalists, editors, TV and radio producers, researchers, film-makers, teachers, speakers, event planners and quiz setters.

If you’d be willing to review it, and your blog or website is aimed at this sort of audience, please contact us by email (mail@ideas4writers.co.uk) giving the address of your blog or website. We’ll send you a free PDF copy by return.

How to Win Short Story CompetitionsIf The Date-A-Base Book 2017 doesn’t appeal to you or your audience, how about How to Win Short Story Competitions? Ask for a free review copy of that one instead – or as well!

Thanks in advance for your help.

50 Newsworthy Anniversaries in February 2017 for you to write about (and make money from)

Tuesday, 16 August 2016

Here are 50 newsworthy anniversaries coming up in February 2017 for you to write about (and make money from). The anniversaries are listed 6 months in advance to give you enough time to find markets, and research and write your articles.

For more details about how to do this, download our booklet: Ditch Your Day Job – the easiest way to make a living as a writer.

We have painstakingly cross-checked every entry, but you are advised to check all facts again as part of your research. Please let us know of any errors you find.


The Date-A-Base Book 2016The listing below is a small sample of the entries for February from The Date-A-Base Book 2017
There are 272 anniversaries for February in the book (more than five times more than are listed here). The book covers the whole of 2017 from January to December and features more than 4,000 anniversaries in total.

Just one published article should cover the cost of your copy many times over – and the book also explains how to get your articles published.

600 years ago (23 Feb 1417)
Birth of Pope Paul II.

300 years ago (19 Feb 1717)
Birth of David Garrick, British actor, playwright, producer and theatre manager. Manager of London’s Drury Lane Theatre for 29 years, during which time it became one of the leading theatres in Europe.

150 years ago (3 Feb 1867)
Meiji became Emperor of Japan.

150 years ago (7 Feb 1867)
Birth of Laura Ingalls Wilder, American children’s writer. Best known for her Little House series, based on her childhood in a pioneer family in the American Midwest.

150 years ago (15 Feb 1867)
Johann Strauss’s waltz The Blue Danube was performed for the first time, in Vienna, Austria.

125 years ago (15 Feb 1892)
Birth of James Forrestal, the first U.S. Secretary of Defense (1947–-49). As U.S. Secretary of the Navy (1944-–47) he directed the huge naval expansion and procurement programmes of WWII. The world’s first supercarrier (aircraft carrier) was named USS Forrestal in his honour.

125 years ago (27 Feb 1892)
Death of Louis Vuitton, French businessman. Known for his luxury luggage products.

100 years ago (3 Feb 1917)
World War I: the American cargo ship Housatonic was sunk by a German submarine in the Atlantic. The crew were ordered into the lifeboats before the torpedo was fired, and all survived. (The Housatonic was formerly the German passenger ship SS Georgia. It was interned by the USA at the outbreak of the war and sold to a U.S. company for conversion into a cargo ship.)

100 years ago (5 Feb 1917)
The U.S. Congress passed the Immigration Act of 1917 (also known as the Asiatic Barred Zone Act) on its 4th attempt, over President Woodrow Wilson’s veto. It banned a wide range of ‘undesirables’ from entering the country. The most controversial part of the act banned immigration from large parts of Asia and the Pacific Islands (previously only the Chinese had been banned). Parts of it were repealed in 1943 (Chinese) and 1946 (Asian Indians and Filipinos) and it was superseded by the McCarran-Walter Act in 1952 (which covered Japanese, Koreans and other Asians).

100 years ago (11 Feb 1917)
Birth of Sidney Sheldon, Tony Award-winning American novelist and screenwriter. During his TV career he created popular shows including The Patty Duke Show, I Dream of Jeannie and Hart to Hart. He then became a best-selling crime/thriller novelist. His books include Master of the Game, The Other Side of Midnight and Rage of Angels.

100 years ago (12 Feb 1917)
Birth of Dom DiMaggio, (‘The Little Professor’), American baseball player (Boston Red Sox). Brother of Joe DiMaggio and Vince DiMaggio.

100 years ago (25 Feb 1917)
Birth of Anthony Burgess, British novelist, playwright, composer and literary critic . Best known for his novels A Clockwork Orange (adapted into a controversial film by Stanley Kubrick) and Earthly Powers.

80 years ago (11 Feb 1937)
The Flint (Michigan) sit-down strike against General Motors (GM) ended. This famous strike led to the formal establishment and recognition of the United Automobile Workers (UAW) trade union, and later to the unionisation of the entire U.S. car industry. (The strike had begun on 30th December 1936, and ended when GM agreed to recognise the UAW.)

75 years ago (1 Feb 1942)
Vidkun Quisling became Minister President of Nazi-occupied Norway. (This led to his conviction for treason and execution after the war in 1945.)

75 years ago (1 Feb 1942)
World War II – the Marshalls-Gilberts raids (Micronesia). The first offensive action by the U.S. Navy against Japan following the attacks on Pearl Harbor and Wake Island. Minor damage was inflicted on Japanese garrisons, but it helped raise U.S. morale. This raid led to the Battle of Midway in June.

75 years ago (8 – 15 Feb 1942)
World War II – the Battle of Singapore. Japanese victory, leading to the Japanese occupation of Singapore until September 1945. This battle included the Battle of Bukit Timah (10th – 12th February) and the Battle of Pasir Panjang (13th – 14th February) – both Japanese victories.

75 years ago (9 Feb 1942)
World War II: the Joint Chiefs of Staff was officially established in the USA.

75 years ago (9 Feb 1942)
World War II: ‘War Time’ (year-round Daylight Saving Time) went into effect in the USA. (Ended September 1945.)

75 years ago (9 Feb 1942)
World War II: soap rationing began in Britain so that supplies of fats and oils could be saved for food production.

75 years ago (17 Feb 1942)
Birth of Huey P. Newton, American political activist. Co-founder of the Black Panther Party – established following incidents of alleged police brutality and racism. Convicted of killing a police officer (later acquitted). Jailed for misappropriating public funds. (Shot dead in 1989.)

75 years ago (18 Feb – 4 Mar 1942)
World War II: the Sook Ching. Japanese forces massacred up to 100,000 Chinese in Singapore and Malaya. (The exact death toll is disputed.)

75 years ago (19 Feb 1942)
World War II: U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 authorising the military to relocate and intern Japanese Americans living along the Pacific coast.

75 years ago (22 Feb 1942)
World War II: U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt ordered General Douglas MacArthur out of the Philippines. He was the USA’s most experienced general and regarded as a symbol of the Allied resistance against the Japanese. If the Philippines fell, as seemed likely, he would be captured as a prisoner of war, which would benefit the Japanese. He was ordered to take command of U.S. forces in Australia instead. (He received the message on 23rd February and left the Philippines – with considerable reluctance – on 12th March, vowing to return to finish the job.)

70 years ago (7 Feb 1947)
The first of the Dead Sea Scrolls were found in caves in Khirbat Qumran (now in the West Bank, Palestine).

70 years ago (25 Feb 1947)
Prussia was officially abolished and became part of Germany.

65 years ago (1 Feb 1952)
The British Post Office began using detector vans to track down users of unlicensed television sets.

65 years ago (6 Feb 1952)
Death of George VI, King of the United Kingdom. Succeeded by his daughter Elizabeth II.

65 years ago (17 Feb 1952)
British Prime Minister Winston Churchill announced that Britain had developed its own atomic bomb and would carry out a test before the end of the year. (The test took place on 3rd October.)

50 years ago (3 Feb 1967)
Death of Joe Meek, Ivor Novello Award-winning British record producer and songwriter. He wrote songs for numerous artists. His best-remembered hit is Telstar by the Tornadoes. He also produced music for films. (Committed suicide after murdering his landlady.)

50 years ago (5 Feb 1967)
NASA launched its Lunar Orbiter 3 spacecraft to the Moon to photograph potential landing sites for the Surveyor and Apollo missions.

50 years ago (10 Feb 1967)
The 25th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was adopted. It clarifies the procedure for dealing with presidential succession or disability and the appointment of the Vice President.

50 years ago (18 Feb 1967)
Death of J. Robert Oppenheimer, American theoretical physicist, educator and administrator. Known as the ‘father of the atomic bomb’. Director of Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico (1943-–45). Director of the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, New Jersey (1947-–66).

50 years ago (28 Feb 1967)
Death of Henry Luce, American magazine publishing magnate who established Time, Life, Fortune, House & Home and Sports Illustrated. Husband of the playwright and politician Clare Boothe Luce.

40 years ago (12 Feb 1977)
The Boston Computer Society was founded in Massachusetts, USA, with over 30,000 members in 40 countries, including many notable computer pioneers. Several major organisations made important product announcements at its meetings. (Disbanded 1996.)

30 years ago (26 Feb 1987)
The Tower Commission published its report on the Iran-Contra affair. It criticised U.S. President Ronald Reagan for failing to properly supervise his national security staff and not being aware of their actions.

25 years ago (7 Feb 1992)
The Maastricht Treaty was signed, establishing the European Union (with effect from 1st November 1993).

25 years ago (10 Feb 1992)
American boxer Mike Tyson was convicted of raping Miss Black America contestant Desiree Washington. (He served 3 years in prison.)

25 years ago (17 Feb 1992)
American serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer was sentenced to 15 consecutive life terms by a court in Wisconsin. He was particularly notable for the gruesome nature of his crimes, which included cannibalism and necrophilia. (Beaten to death by a fellow inmate in November 1994.)

25 years ago (20 Feb 1992)
The English Premier League was founded, superseding the first division of the Football League.

25 years ago (20 Feb 1992)
Death of Dick York, American film and television actor. Best known for his role as Darrin Stephens in the TV sitcom Bewitched. (He was forced to quit the show due to back pain from an injury incurred while filming a movie, and spent much of his later years bedridden.)

25 years ago (25 – 26 Feb 1992)
Nagorno-Karabakh War – the Khojaly Massacre, Azerbaijan. Hundreds of civilians were killed by Armenian armed forces.

20 years ago (4 Feb 1997)
American actor and former football star O. J. Simpson was found liable for the deaths of his ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ronald Goldman at a civil trial in Santa Monica, California. (On 10th February he was ordered to pay a fine of $25 million and compensation of $8.5 million.)

20 years ago (4 Feb 1997)
Apple Computer bought Steve Jobs’ company NeXT, and Jobs returned to Apple as an adviser. Apple CEO Gil Amelio, who oversaw the purchase, was ousted in July 1997 and replaced by Jobs in September. (Jobs had been ousted from Apple, the company he co-founded, in 1985. NeXT’s operating system NeXTSTEP became the basis for Apple’s Mac OSX.)

20 years ago (21 Feb 1997)
The ‘Bridgewater Three’ were released. The 3 British men had been jailed for the 1978 murder of newspaper delivery boy Carl Bridgewater, but were released after their trial was ruled unfair. (A 4th man had also been convicted but he died in jail in 1981.)

20 years ago (22 Feb 1997)
Scientists at the Roslin Institute in Edinburgh, Scotland announced that they had successfully cloned a mammal for the first time: a sheep named Dolly (born 5th July 1996).

20 years ago (23 Feb 1997)
A large fire broke out on the Russian Space station Mir after an oxygen-generating canister malfunctioned.

20 years ago (26 Feb 1997)
Switzerland announced the establishment of the Swiss Humanitarian Fund (also known as the Swiss Fund for Needy Victims of the Holocaust). It distributed about £200 million ($315 million) to about 312,000 victims of the Nazi atrocities worldwide.

20 years ago (27 Feb 1997)
The Firearms (Amendment) Act 1997 came into effect in Britain. It banned the possession of most handguns. (All handguns were banned in February 1998 when the Firearms (Amendment) (No. 2) Act 1997 came into effect.)

20 years ago (27 Feb 1997)
Divorce was legalised in Ireland.

20 years ago (28 Feb 1997)
Ardabil earthquake, north-west Iran. More than 1,000 people were killed, 2,600 injured, and around 40,000 left homeless.


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50 Newsworthy Anniversaries in January 2017 for you to write about (and make money from)

Monday, 18 July 2016

Here are 50 newsworthy anniversaries coming up in January 2017 for you to write about (and make money from). The anniversaries are listed 6 months in advance to give you enough time to find markets, and research and write your articles.

For more details about how to do this, grab a free copy of our ebook: Ditch Your Day Job – the easiest way to make a living as a writer.

We have painstakingly cross-checked every entry, but you are advised to check all facts again as part of your research. Please let us know of any errors you find.


The Date-A-Base Book 2016The listing below is a small sample of the entries for January from The Date-A-Base Book 2017
There are 340 anniversaries for January in the book (nearly seven times more than are listed here). The book covers the whole of 2017 from January to December and features more than 4,000 anniversaries in total.

Just one published article should cover the cost of your copy many times over – and the book also explains how to get your articles published.

150 years ago (17 Jan 1867)
Birth of Carl Laemmle, pioneering German-born American film producer and distributor. Co-founder of Universal Pictures.

125 years ago (1 Jan 1892)
Ellis Island immigrant inspection station was officially opened in Upper New York Bay, USA. (It remained in operation until November 1954, by which time it had processed 12 million immigrants. It is now a museum and a part of the Statue of Liberty National Monument.)

125 years ago (3 Jan 1892)
Birth of J. R. R. Tolkien, British novelist, poet, scholar and educator. Best known for his fantasy novels The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings and The Silmarillion.

125 years ago (18 Jan 1892)
Birth of Oliver Hardy, American comic actor (Laurel & Hardy).

100 years ago (5 Jan 1917)
Birth of Jane Wyman, Academy Award-winning American film and television actress, singer and dancer (Johnny Belinda [film], Falcon Crest [TV]). First wife of U.S. President Ronald Reagan.

100 years ago (10 Jan 1917)
Birth of Jerry Wexler, American record producer and music journalist. Co-owner of Atlantic records. Vice-president of Warner Brothers Records. He coined the term ‘rhythm and blues’ and signed and/or produced many of the biggest acts from the 1950s to the 1980s.

100 years ago (10 Jan 1917)
Death of William F. Cody, (‘Buffalo Bill’), colourful American frontiersman and showman. Known for Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show, which made him a global star.

100 years ago (16 Jan 1917)
Death of George Dewey, American Admiral of the Navy (the highest ranked naval officer in U.S. history). Best known for his victory at the Battle of Manila Bay during the Spanish-American War.

100 years ago (19 Jan 1917)
Silvertown explosion, London Borough of Newham, UK. 50 tons of TNT exploded when a fire broke out at a munitions factory that was making explosives for WWI. 73 people were killed and over 400 injured. The blast was heard 100 miles away and substantial damage was caused to the local area, with up to 70,000 properties damaged and 900 destroyed.

100 years ago (24 Jan 1917)
Birth of Ernest Borgnine, Academy Award-winning American stage, film and television actor (From Here to Eternity, Bad Day at Black Rock, Marty, The Dirty Dozen, Ice Station Zebra, The Wild Bunch, The Poseidon Adventure, Airwolf [TV series]).

80 years ago (1 Jan 1937)
Speedometers, and safety glass in windscreens became compulsory in all vehicles in Britain.

75 years ago (1 Jan 1942)
World War II: 26 countries signed the Declaration of the United Nations in Washington, D.C., USA, pledging to employ their full resources against Hitler and the Axis powers.

75 years ago (2 Jan 1942)
World War II: Japanese forces captured Manila, the capital of the Philippines.

75 years ago (3 Jan 1942)
Birth of John Thaw, British actor (The Sweeney, Inspector Morse, Kavanagh QC, and many others). (Died 2002.)

75 years ago (6 Jan 1942)
Pan American Airways’ Pacific Clipper flying boat completed the first round-the-world trip by a commercial plane.

75 years ago (11 Jan 1942)
World War II: Japan invaded the Dutch East Indies and captured Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

75 years ago (16 Jan 1942)
Death of Carole Lombard, American actress. Noted for her comedy roles in a string of successful 1930s Hollywood movies. (Killed in a plane crash while promoting war bonds).

75 years ago (16 Jan 1942)
World War II: Japan began its invasion of Burma (now Myanmar).

75 years ago (20 Jan 1942)
Holocaust: the infamous Wannsee Conference was held in Germany. Nazi officials met to plan the ‘final solution to the Jewish question’.

75 years ago (21 Jan 1942)
Birth of Edwin Starr, American soul singer. Best known for the song War. (Died 2003.)

75 years ago (26 Jan 1942)
World War II: the first U.S. troops arrived in Europe. 4,508 soldiers from the 34th Infantry Regiment docked in Belfast, Northern Ireland.

75 years ago (29 Jan 1942)
The first episode of Desert Island Discs was broadcast on BBC radio in the UK. It is Britain’s longest-running radio show.

75 years ago (31 Jan 1942)
Birth of Derek Jarman, British avant-garde filmmaker (Jubilee, The Tempest, Caravaggio, War Requiem, Edward II and more). (Died 1994.)

60 years ago (1 Jan 1957)
Border Campaign (also known as Operation Harvest) – the IRA carried out a well-known raid on Brookeborough RUC barracks in County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland. Two IRA volunteers, Seán South and Fergal O’Hanlon, were shot dead. (Their lives are now commemorated in Irish Republican songs.)

60 years ago (16 – 18 Jan 1957)
Operation Power Flite: the first non-stop around-the-world flight by a jet aircraft. Three Boeing B-52 Stratofortresses completed the flight in 45 hours and 19 minutes. (They required mid-air refuelling during the journey.)

60 years ago (16 Jan 1957)
The Cavern Club opened in Liverpool, UK. Initially a jazz venue, it became an important rock venue when the Beatles played there during their early years.

50 years ago (3 Jan 1967)
Death of Jack Ruby, American nightclub owner who shot and killed Lee Harvey Oswald two days after the latter was arrested for the assassination of U.S. President John F. Kennedy.

50 years ago (4 Jan 1967)
Death of Donald Campbell, British car and motorboat driver who broke 8 world speed records on land and water, emulating his father, Sir Malcolm Campbell. (Killed on Coniston Water while attempting to break the world water speed record.)

50 years ago (12 Jan 1967)
American psychology professor James Bedford became the first person to have his body cryonically preserved (frozen) following his death, with the intention of future resuscitation.

50 years ago (14 Jan 1967)
The Human Be-In took place in Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, California, USA. The gathering of 20,000 (or 30,000) counter-culture tribes, gurus and rock musicians was a prelude to the Summer of Love.

50 years ago (15 Jan 1967)
The first Super Bowl was played. The Green Bay Packers beat the Kansas City Chiefs 35-–10 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in California.

50 years ago (16 Jan 1967)
Death of Robert J. Van de Graaff, prize-winning American physicist and educator. Best known for inventing the Van de Graaff generator, which generates a high-voltage electrostatic charge.

50 years ago (18 Jan 1967)
The ‘Boston Strangler’ (Albert DeSalvo) was sentenced to life in prison for murdering 13 women in Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

50 years ago (27 Jan 1967)
Apollo 1 tragedy: three U.S. astronauts (Gus Grissom, Ed White and Roger B. Chaffee) were killed when their command module caught fire during a pre-launch test at Cape Canaveral, Florida. (Cause: electric arcs from exposed/worn wiring, combined with a pure oxygen atmosphere.)

50 years ago (27 Jan 1967)
The Outer Space Treaty was signed by the USA, UK and the Soviet Union. Countries which sign the treaty are barred from using space for anything other than peaceful purposes. The placement or testing of nuclear weapons in space is also banned. (The treaty came into effect on 10th October 1967 and has now been signed by more than 100 countries.)

50 years ago (29 Jan 1967)
The Mantra-Rock Dance, San Francisco, California, USA. Known as the ‘ultimate high’ and the ‘major spiritual event of the San Francisco hippie era’. Organised by followers of the International Society for Krishna Consciousness, the counterculture rock concert promoted and raised funds for the first Hare Krishna centre on the U.S. West Coast.

40 years ago (3 Jan 1977)
Apple Computer, Inc. was incorporated. (It was renamed Apple Inc. in 2007.)

40 years ago (6 Jan 1977)
British punk rock band the Sex Pistols were fired by their record company, EMI, after just 3 months because of their notorious behaviour. (They signed with A&M Records in March but were quickly fired again, and finally signed with Virgin Records in May.)

40 years ago (15 Jan 1977)
Kälvesta air disaster, Stockholm, Sweden. Linjeflyg Flight 618 crashed on its approach to Stockholm Bromma Airport, killing all 22 people on board. (Cause: ice build-up on the tailplane.) It was the worst air crash in Swedish history.

40 years ago (18 Jan 1977)
Granville rail disaster, Sydney, Australia. A crowded commuter train derailed and crashed into a bridge which collapsed onto two of the train’s carriages. 83 people were killed and 210 injured. It was the worst rail disaster in Australia’s history.

40 years ago (18 Jan 1977)
The previously unknown Legionella bacterium (which causes Legionnaires’ disease and Pontiac fever) was identified for the first time. It was found in the air conditioning system of the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, where the first recorded outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease killed 34 people in July 1976.

40 years ago (20 Jan 1977)
Jimmy Carter was inaugurated as the 39th President of the United States.

30 years ago (20 Jan 1987)
Terry Waite, the Archbishop of Canterbury’s special envoy in the Middle East, was kidnapped in Beirut, Lebanon while on a peace mission to negotiate the release of hostages. (Released November 1991.)

25 years ago (8 Jan 1992)
U.S. President George H. W. Bush vomited and collapsed at a state dinner at the Japanese Prime Minister’s residence in Tokyo. (Gastric ‘flu).

25 years ago (9 Jan 1992)
The discovery of the first two confirmed exoplanets was announced by astronomers Aleksander Wolszczan and Dale Frail. The planets orbit the pulsar PSR B1257+12. (A third planet was confirmed there in 1994. Nearly 2,000 exoplanets have been discovered, orbiting over 1,200 stars.)

25 years ago (16 Jan 1992)
The Chapultepec Peace Accords were signed in Mexico, ending the 12-year civil war in El Salvador.

20 years ago (15 Jan 1997)
Princess Diana walked through a minefield in Angola, visited victims, and called for an international ban on landmines.

20 years ago (23 Jan 1997)
Madeleine Albright became the first female U.S. Secretary of State.

10 years ago (4 Jan 2007)
Nancy Pelosi became the first female Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives.

10 years ago (11 Jan 2007)
China destroyed its Fengyun FY-1C weather satellite in a ballistic missile test. It created more than 2,800 items of high-velocity space debris, and was widely condemned.


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