What If? 29 Creative Writing Prompts for February

Tuesday, 2 February 2016

Here’s this month’s selection of What Ifs to stimulate your brain – what can you do with these? Some of them are deliberately vague or ambiguous so you can interpret them in different ways!

There’s one for each day of the month. If you need more please take a look at our book The Fastest Way to Get Ideas – 4,400 Essential What Ifs for Writers.

What if…

1. the FTSE or Dow Jones share index fell to 0?

2. green was no longer a colour?

3. you thought you were a robot?

4. someone cast a spell on you – with or without your knowledge?

5. you suffered a crisis of conscience?

6. you were in a Catch-22 situation?

7. you learned that someone, who was not your partner, was in love with you?

8. someone was injuring all the children in a particular class, in alphabetical order?

9. every time you drove along a particular road you came across the same person standing/sitting/lying there and had to drive around them?

10. one of the major countries of the world was at war with every other country?

11. you tried to learn something as an adult that just about everyone else had learned as children?

12. every year you set yourself a new challenge?

13. you retreated into your mind to escape your real-life situation?

14. everyone you met today seemed to come from a place you had never heard of?

15. someone walked into a police station and announced that he/she had killed God?

16. the residents of a small island nation that you had never visited elected you as their monarch?

17. you were the child of a monarch and expected to inherit the role – but the populace hated you?

18. you were one of a small number of survivors and were given an essential role within the group that you had little or no prior experience of?

19. you were rehired to do a job you had left years ago?

20. you were given the task of listing 101 great things about the place you lived in, but you could only think of 5?

21. you experienced the downsides of celebrity?

22. you quickly learned a new skill and became highly renowned after discovering you had a talent for it, but you incurred the wrath of those who had been struggling with it for years?

23. the greatest hurricane the world had ever known made it all the way across the Atlantic without losing any of its strength?

24. it was declared that one of the world’s most notorious serial killers, who had been in prison for decades, was in fact entirely innocent?

25. whenever you held a book-signing session someone in the queue was killed?

26. you were asked to help the police track down someone you had once worked with?

27. you were left a business in a will, and were required to turn it from the third-biggest in town to the biggest within five years or you would forfeit both the business and the millions you would inherit if you succeeded?

28. you made the most of the freedom that comes with electronic/self-publishing and invented an entirely new genre (or hybrid genre)?

29. during your wedding ceremony your spouse-to-be said, loudly and clearly, someone else’s name rather than yours?

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The Date-A-Base Book 2016 corrections

Tuesday, 26 January 2016

Hello. We need to tell you about a correction we’ve made to the 2016 edition of The Date-A-Base Book.

Correction

The first football (soccer) penalty kick was on 6th June 1891, not 6th January.

More details here:

www.scottishsporthistory.com/sports-history-news-and-blog/born-in-scotland-the-story-of-the-penalty-kick

Many thanks to Jonathan and Mike for alerting us.

***

If you need (or want) to know what will be making the news in the months to come, try The Date-A-Base Book series. It’s the easy way to see into the future!

Current editions:

2016: www.ideas4writers.co.uk/2016

2017: www.ideas4writers.co.uk/2017

2018: due for release late spring

 

50 Newsworthy Anniversaries in July 2016 for you to write about (and make money from)

Monday, 18 January 2016

Here are 50 newsworthy anniversaries coming up in July 2016 for you to write about (and make money from). The anniversaries are listed 6 months in advance to give you enough time to find markets, and research and write your articles.

We have painstakingly cross-checked every entry, but you are advised to check all facts again as part of your research. Please let us know of any errors you find.


The Date-A-Base Book 2016The listing below is a small sample of the entries for July from The Date-A-Base Book 2016
There are 317 anniversaries for July in the book, which covers the whole of 2016 from January to December and features more than 3,450 anniversaries in total.

Just one published article should cover the cost of your copy many times over.

If you need to work further ahead, The Date-A-Base Book 2017 is also available.

—–

800 years ago (16 Jul 1216)
Death of Pope Innocent III, succeeded by Honorius III

250 years ago (8 Jul 1766)
Birth of Dominique Jean Larrey, Baron Larrey, innovative French military surgeon during the Napoleonic Wars. He introduced mobile field hospitals and an army ambulance corps, used carriages to rapidly transport wounded soldiers from the battlefield, manned the carriages with trained personnel, and introduced a triage system so that the most seriously injured were treated first.

200 years ago (7 Jul 1816)
Death of Richard Brinsley Sheridan, Irish-born playwright, poet, theatrical impresario and politician. Owner of the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane in London. Best known for his play The School for Scandal.

200 years ago (9 Jul 1816)
Argentina declared its independence from Spain.

200 years ago (14 Jul 1816)
Death of Francisco de Miranda, Venezuelan revolutionary who paved the way for the independence of the Spanish-American colonies. His own plans failed, but those who followed him &endash; most notably Simón Bolívar – were more effective.

200 years ago (21 Jul 1816)
Birth of Paul Julius Reuter, Baron von Reuter, German-born British journalist and media owner who pioneered the use of the electric telegraph in news-gathering and dissemination. Founder of Reuters news agency.

150 years ago (3 Jul 1866)
Austro-Prussian War – the Battle of Königgratz. Prussian victory. This was the decisive battle of the war.

150 years ago (20 Jul 1866)
Death of Bernhard Riemann, influential German mathematician whose contributions to analysis, number theory and differential geometry laid the mathematical foundation for Einstein’s theory of relativity.

150 years ago (24 Jul 1866)
Tennessee became the first U.S. state to rejoin the Union following the American Civil War. (It had also been the last to secede.)

150 years ago (25 Jul 1866)
Ulysses S. Grant (later U.S. President) became the first General of the Army of the United States. (This rank is now called 5-star general.)

150 years ago (27 Jul 1866)
The first successful telegraph cable was laid across the Atlantic Ocean between Valentia, Ireland and Heart’s Content, Newfoundland. (The first cable, laid in 1858, failed after only a few weeks when attempts to send higher voltages through it melted the insulation. A second attempt in 1865 failed when the cable broke and the end was lost – it was found later in 1866 and spliced to a new cable, but was never as good as the 1866 cable.)

150 years ago (28 Jul 1866)
The Metric Act of 1866 came into effect in the USA, authorising the use of the metric system. (In December 1975 the U.S. Congress passed the Metric Conversion Act, making the metric system the preferred system for weights and measures in trade and commerce – though customary units were still permitted.)

150 years ago (28 Jul 1866)
Birth of Beatrix Potter, British children’s writer and illustrator who created enduring animal characters including Peter Rabbit, Squirrel Nutkin, Mrs. Tiggy-Winkle, Jemima Puddle-Duck and many others.

100 years ago (1 Jul – 18 Nov 1916)
World War I – the Battle of the Somme (France). Result: inconclusive. This was the first battle to use tanks.

100 years ago (4 Jul 1916)
Birth of Tokyo Rose (Iva Toguri D’Aquino), American broadcaster of Japanese propaganda to Allied troops stationed in the South Pacific during WWII. (She was later convicted of treason and served 6 years in prison.)

100 years ago (8 Jul 1916)
Coca-Cola introduced its iconic contoured bottle.

100 years ago (9 Jul 1916)
Birth of Sir Edward Heath, British Prime Minister (1970–74).

100 years ago (15 Jul 1916)
The Boeing Company was founded in the USA (as Pacific Aero Products).

80 years ago (17 Jul 1936 – 1 Apr 1939)
The Spanish Civil War. Nationalist victory.

80 years ago (24 Jul 1936)
The speaking clock telephone service was launched in the UK. (The world’s first speaking clock service began in France in Feb 1933.)

75 years ago (1 Jul 1941)
Commercial broadcasting was legalised in the USA. NBC and CBS both launched their television services. NBC beat CBS onto the air by 1 hour, becoming the first commercial TV station in the USA. NBC was also the first to broadcast a TV commercial (for Bulova watches). The USA also formally adopted the NTSC standard on this day.

75 years ago (6 Jul – 5 Aug 1941)
World War II – Operation Barbarossa – the Battle of Smolensk. The first major battle during the German invasion of the Soviet Union. German victory, but the two-month delay it caused would prove costly later, since Hitler had assumed the operation would be over quickly and had not prepared for a winter war. (By the end of November, Germany had lost nearly a quarter of its forces, and supplies and ammunition were running low.)

75 years ago (10 Jul 1941)
Death of Jelly Roll Morton, American ragtime and jazz pianist and composer.

75 years ago (12 Jul 1941)
World War II: the Anglo-Soviet Agreement was signed by Britain and the Soviet Union, establishing a formal military alliance against Germany. They agreed to assist each other and not make separate peace deals with Germany.

75 years ago (19 or 20 Jul 1941)
World War II: British Prime Minister Winston Churchill launched his ‘V for Victory’ campaign.

75 years ago (20 Jul 1941)
Death of Lew Fields, American actor, comedian, vaudeville star and theatrical producer. Noted for his partnership with Joe Weber (Weber and Fields) – they performed slapstick routines in a fake Dutch dialect.

60 years ago (26 Jul 1956)
Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser nationalised the Suez Canal, froze the assets of the Suez Canal Company and closed the canal to Israeli shipping, after the USA refused to finance the Aswan High Dam. (This sparked international condemnation and led to the Suez Crisis in October.)

60 years ago (30 Jul 1956)
‘In God We Trust’ was officially adopted as the U.S. national motto.

50 years ago (1 Jul 1966)
The Medicare health insurance programme began operating in the USA. It offered health insurance to those aged 65 and older.

50 years ago (2 Jul 1966)
France carried out its first nuclear test in the Pacific, at Moruroa Atoll (also spelled Mururoa), French Polynesia. (The bomb was codenamed Aldébaran.)

50 years ago (18 Jul 1966)
NASA launched its Gemini 10 manned spacecraft, with astronauts John W. Young and Michael Collins on board. It returned safely to Earth 3 days later, having made 43 orbits.

50 years ago (23 Jul 1966)
Death of Montgomery Clift, American stage and film actor. Noted for his emotional depth and sense of vulnerability in films such as Red River, A Place in the Sun, I Confess, From Here to Eternity, The Young Lions and The Misfits.

50 years ago (30 Jul 1966)
The 1966 FIFA World Cup final was played in London. England beat Germany 4–2. English player Geoff Hurst became the only man to score a hat-trick in a World Cup final. (At the time of writing this remains England’s only World Cup win.)

40 years ago (1 Jul 1976)
The first Apple computer, the Apple I, went on sale (for $666.66). Buyers received a single circuit board and had to provide (or build) their own case, power supply, keyboard, TV (for display) and a cassette recorder (for storage – though this required an add-on interface, sold separately). About 200 were built, of which about 175 were sold.

40 years ago (2 Jul 1976)
North Vietnam and South Vietnam were reunited as the Socialist Republic of Vietnam, with Hanoi as its capital. (Hanoi was formerly the capital of North Vietnam.)

40 years ago (10 Jul 1976)
Seveso disaster, northern Italy. An industrial accident at a chemical plant released a cloud of dioxins into residential areas, affecting around 120,000 people. 3,300 farm animals died and a further 80,000 were slaughtered. Some people suffered long-term health issues.

40 years ago (20 Jul 1976)
NASA’s Viking 1 lander successfully landed on Mars and sent back the first photo taken from the surface of Mars.

40 years ago (21 – 23 Jul 1976)
Legionnaire’s Disease: the American Legion held its annual convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Within a week, 25 attendees had died from the first recognised cases of Legionnaire’s Disease. In total, 221 attendees contracted the disease and 34 of them died (some sources give different figures). The new bacterium was discovered in the hotel’s air conditioning system and named Legionella after its first victims.

40 years ago (28 Jul 1976)
Tangshan earthquake, China. More than 240,000 people were killed (some sources claim at least 650,000, as the official figure only included those in the immediate area). Going by the larger estimate, it was the world’s worst earthquake of the 20th century (by death toll) and the second-worst in recorded history.

40 years ago (28 Jul 1976)
The official world airspeed record was broken by Captain Eldon W. Joersz and Major George T. Morgan in a Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird at Beale Air Force Base, California, USA. The record of 2,193.2 mph (3,529.6 km/h) still stands.

30 years ago (23 Jul 1986)
Britain’s Prince Andrew married Sarah Ferguson in Westminster Abbey, London, and they became the Duke and Duchess of York.

30 years ago (28 Jul 1986)
British estate agent Suzy Lamplugh failed to return from an appointment in London, sparking the biggest missing person investigation since Lord Lucan. She has never been found.

25 years ago (1 Jul 1991)
Death of Michael Landon, American television actor, director and producer (Bonanza, Little House on the Prairie, Highway to Heaven).

25 years ago (2 Jul 1991)
Death of Lee Remick, American film and television actress.

25 years ago (5 Jul 1991)
International regulators shut down the Bank of Credit and Commerce International (BCCI) due to money-laundering and other financial crimes.

25 years ago (10 Jul 1991)
Boris Yeltsin was sworn in as the first directly elected President of Russia.

25 years ago (22 Jul 1991)
British Prime Minister John Major launched the Citizen’s Charter, which aimed to measure, improve and maintain the standard of public services.

20 years ago (5 Jul 1996)
Birth of Dolly the sheep, the world’s first cloned mammal. (Died 2003.)

20 years ago (27 Jul 1996)
A bomb exploded in Centennial Olympic Park, Atlanta, Georgia, USA, during the Olympic Games. 2 people were killed and over 100 injured.

10 years ago (15 Jul 2006)
Twitter, the online micro-blogging service, was publicly launched.


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Price if purchased individually: £214.56
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What If? 31 Creative Writing Prompts for January

Tuesday, 12 January 2016

Here’s this month’s selection of What Ifs to stimulate your brain – what can you do with these? Some of them are deliberately vague or ambiguous so you can interpret them in different ways!

There’s one for each day of the month. If you need more please take a look at our book The Fastest Way to Get Ideas – 4,400 Essential What Ifs for Writers.

What if…

1. events from real life sounded too implausible to include in your novel?

2. everyone’s IQ dropped by 50 points overnight?

3. everyone’s IQ rose by 50 points overnight?

4. everyone’s IQ reversed overnight, so the most intelligent became the least intelligent and vice versa?

5. trouble had a way of finding you?

6. you did all of your children’s homework while they got on with something that you felt was far more important and worthwhile?

7. your partner became suspicious when you said you were working late – and they were right to be, but not for the reason they thought?

8. you were addicted to having cosmetic surgery?

9. people said you really needed cosmetic surgery and offered to pay for it?

10. a stranger offered to make you a star?

11. a stranger offered to dress you like a million dollars?

12. a stranger identified that you had a hidden talent and offered to pay for you to develop it?

13. Christmas was moved to once every four years as it had become too commercialised and expensive, and older people felt it came around too soon?

14. Christmas products were not allowed to be sold until 7 days before Christmas?

15. birthdays were held when you and your friends and family agreed that a full year had passed since the last one, irrespective of what the calendar said?

16. you disappeared?

17. you found yourself somewhere else and had no idea how you’d got there?

18. you were told you apologised too much, so resolved to fix it?

19. you refused to let your nerves get the better of you?

20. you were accused of being vulgar, which might or might not have come as a surprise?

21. readers said your stories sounded ‘too fictional’?

22. readers said your stories didn’t sound fictional enough?

23. your reputation lay in ruins?

24. your reputation was restored?

25. bathing became (or was still) a public activity?

26. everyone thought you were lucky – but you didn’t?

27. everyone thought you were unlucky – but you didn’t?

28. you decided you would no longer settle for an ordinary life?

29. someone gave you a truly inconvenient gift?

30. you learned that you’d been studying the wrong subject?

31. you discovered that you had donated the money to the wrong cause?

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New Year – New Plans – New Offers!

Tuesday, 5 January 2016

Happy New Year from Dave and Kate at ideas4writers!

We’re already hard at work on the new books we’re planning to bring you this year.

Dave is engrossed in Chapter 6 of his novel, Brassica Park, which features the characters Stan and Martha Bean. You may have seen them having little adventures in the 35 volumes of our ideas collection. Now they’re involved in a book-length adventure that will not only change their lives but several other peoples’ too. The writing and publishing industry features quite heavily, of course. (Stan’s publisher is pure evil!) Dave has promised a short teaser next month.

Meanwhile Kate is looking after our non-fiction department. She’s currently preparing The Date-A-Base Book 2017 for printing – the ebook version is already on sale. And she’s downloading the source files for the 2018 edition, which they’ll work on together once Dave has finished Brassica Park.

The Date-A-Base is our annual collection of forthcoming newsworthy and notable anniversaries. It’s hugely popular with writers, journalists, TV and film companies, event organisers and all sorts of other people, who get to see thousands of things that will be making the news in months, or even years, to come. That gives them plenty of time to research and write their stories and articles, and prepare them for publication or broadcast, to coincide with the anniversaries themselves.

The Date-A-Base Books are the subject of this year’s New Year Giveaway. If you buy either the 2016 or 2017 edition during January, you can also choose one of the 35 ebooks* in our ideas collection as our gift to you. If you buy both editions then you can choose two books from the collection!

All you have to do is email us (mail@ideas4writers.co.uk) once you’ve placed your order, and tell us which book(s) you want as your gift.

If you’ve already bought the books earlier this month, you’re still eligible.

This offer is valid until midnight (UK time) on 31st January 2016.

*Only the 35 single-category books in the ideas collection are included in the giveaway, not the 5 multi-category volumes.

You can see all our books here.

Happy writing!

50 Newsworthy Anniversaries in June 2016 for you to write about (and make money from)

Tuesday, 15 December 2015

Here are 50 newsworthy anniversaries coming up in June 2016 for you to write about (and make money from). The anniversaries are listed 6 months in advance to give you enough time to find markets, and research and write your articles.

We have painstakingly cross-checked every entry, but you are advised to check all facts again as part of your research. Please let us know of any errors you find.


The Date-A-Base Book 2016The listing below is a small sample of the entries for June from The Date-A-Base Book 2016
There are 301 anniversaries for June in the book, which covers the whole of 2016 from January to December and features more than 3,450 anniversaries in total.

Just one published article should cover the cost of your copy many times over.

If you need to work further ahead, The Date-A-Base Book 2017 is also available.

—–

200 years ago (13 Jun 1816)
The Gas Light Company of Baltimore was founded in Maryland, USA. It was the first gas company in the Western hemisphere. (It later became the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company, then became part of Constellation Energy, which later became part of Exelon.)

200 years ago (19 Jun 1816)
Battle of Seven Oaks (near Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada) between the North West Company and the Hudson Bay Company. North West Company victory.

150 years ago (7 Jun 1866)
Death of Seattle (also spelled Sealth or Seathl), Native American leader. Chief of the Duwamish and Suquamish tribes of the Puget Sound area. The city of Seattle, Washington is named after him.

150 years ago (14 Jun – 23 Aug 1866)
Austro-Prussian War (also known as the Seven Weeks’ War). Prussian victory.

150 years ago (26 Jun 1866)
Birth of George Herbert, 5th Earl of Carnarvon, British aristocrat and Egyptologist who financed Howard Carter’s search and excavation of Tutankhamun’s tomb.

100 years ago (3 Jun 1916)
The National Defense Act came into effect in the USA. It expanded the Army and National Guard, established the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps, began the creation of an Army aviation division, and allowed the federal government to produce and stockpile gunpowder to ensure its immediate availability.

100 years ago (5 Jun 1916 – Oct 1918)
World War I – the Arab Revolt (Ottoman Empire).

100 years ago (5 Jun 1916)
Death of (Horatio) Herbert Kitchener, 1st Earl Kitchener (Lord Kitchener), British Army officer, field marshal and colonial administrator. Secretary of State for War (1914-16). Best known today for his appearance on the iconic posters which encouraged men to sign up for army service. (Killed when his ship HMS Hampshire hit a German mine near the Orkney Islands, Scotland.)

100 years ago (8 Jun 1916)
Birth of Francis Crick, British biophysicist. Joint winner of the 1962 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for discovering the molecular structure of DNA.

100 years ago (12 Jun 1916)
Birth of Irwin Allen, (‘the Master of Disaster’), Academy Award-winning American film, television and documentary producer and director (Lost in Space, The Poseidon Adventure, The Towering Inferno and more).

100 years ago (21 Jun 1916)
Birth of Joseph Cyril Bamford, British businessman and engineer who founded JCB, one of the world’s largest manufacturers of mechanical diggers, backhoes, excavators and other construction equipment.

100 years ago (23 Jun 1916)
Birth of Sir Leonard (‘Len’) Hutton, British cricketer (Yorkshire and England).

100 years ago (24 Jun 1916)
American actress Mary Pickford signed a contract with Adolph Zukor’s Famous Players film company which granted her a record-breaking salary of $10,000 a week as well as full control over the production of the films she starred in. (Some commentators say this was the first million-dollar film contract.)

90 years ago (23 Jun 1926)
The College Board administered the first SAT (Scholastic Aptitude Test) in the USA.

80 years ago (7 Jun 1936)
The Steel Workers Organizing Committee (a trade union) was established in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. (It was disbanded in 1942 and became the United Steel Workers of America.)

80 years ago (26 Jun 1936)
The first practical helicopter, the Focke-Wulf Fw 61, made its first successful test flight in Bremen, Germany. (The first successful helicopter flight was made by the Breguet-Dorand ‘Gyroplane’ in France exactly 1 year earlier, on 26th June 1935.)

80 years ago (30 Jun 1936)
Margaret Mitchell’s novel Gone with the Wind was published.

75 years ago (1 Jun 1941)
World War II: the Battle of Crete ended. Crete surrendered to Germany.

75 years ago (2 Jun 1941)
Death of Lou Gehrig, (‘Iron Horse’), American baseball player. He died of a rare degenerative disorder of the nervous system, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), now known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

75 years ago (4 Jun 1941)
Death of Kaiser Wilhelm II (also known as William II), last Emperor of Germany, King of Prussia.

75 years ago (6 Jun 1941)
Death of Louis Chevrolet, Swiss-born American car designer and racing driver. Co-founder of the Chevrolet Motor Car Company.

75 years ago (12 Jun 1941)
The Inter-Allied Declaration (also known as the The Declaration of St. James’s Palace) was signed in London. Britain, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and the exiled governments of Europe agreed to work together, both in war and in peace. It was the first step towards the establishment of the United Nations.

75 years ago (14 Jun 1941)
The June deportation. The Soviet Union carried out the first in a series of mass deportations of tens of thousands of people from the Baltic states, Belarus, Ukraine and Moldova. The men were sent to Siberian prison camps where they later died, while the women were resettled in other parts of the Soviet Union.

75 years ago (20 Jun 1941)
The U.S. Army Air Forces was established, replacing the U.S. Army Air Corps. (In September 1947 it became the U.S. Air Force.)

75 years ago (22 Jun – 5 Dec 1941)
World War II: Operation Barbarossa – the German invasion of the Soviet Union. The largest military operation in history. Soviet victory – the German invaders were repelled when they reached Moscow and then driven out of the country by a Soviet counter-attack. The operation began with the Battle of Bialystok-Minsk (22nd June – 3rd July. German victory.)

75 years ago (22 Jun 1941)
Holocaust: Nazi Germany’s death squads (Einsatzgruppen) began the systematic killing of Jews, initially in the Soviet Union, but later throughout Occupied Europe. (Exact date uncertain, but it immediately followed the German invasion of the Soviet Union – see above.)

75 years ago (29 Jun 1941)
Birth of Stokely Carmichael, Trinidad-born American black activist. Leader of black nationalism in the USA. Member of the Black Panthers. Originator of the phrase ‘black power’.

70 years ago (1 Jun 1946)
Television licences were introduced in Britain.

70 years ago (6 Jun 1946)
The National Basketball Association (NBA) was founded in the USA (as the Basketball Association of America).

60 years ago (3 Jun 1956)
British Rail renamed its Third Class service as Second Class. (Second Class had been abolished in 1875, leaving First Class and Third Class. Second Class was renamed Standard Class in May 1987.)

60 years ago (19 Jun 1956)
Death of Thomas J. Watson, American businessman. Chairman and CEO of IBM who built the company into the world’s largest manufacturer of data-processing equipment. Named ‘the world’s greatest salesman’.

60 years ago (23 Jun 1956)
Gamal Abdel Nasser became President of Egypt.

60 years ago (29 Jun 1956)
The Federal Aid Highway Act came into effect in the USA. It authorised the construction of the Interstate Highway System – the largest public works project in U.S. history at that time. (Construction was meant to take 10 – 12 years but it actually took 35 years. The system was finally declared complete in October 1992.)

50 years ago (2 Jun 1966)
NASA’s space probe Surveyor 1 landed on the Moon to collect data for the Apollo programme. It was the first U.S. craft to soft-land on another extraterrestrial body. (The Soviet Union’s Luna 9 had achieved the same feat 4 months earlier, on 3rd February.)

50 years ago (3 Jun 1966)
NASA launched its Gemini 9A manned spacecraft on a 3-day mission. (It landed safely on 6th June. The original crew of Gemini 9 were killed in a plane crash on 28th February.)

50 years ago (8 Jun 1966)
Topeka, the state capital of Kansas, USA was devastated by a F5-rated tornado. It caused more than $100 million in damage, making it one of the costliest tornadoes in U.S. history. 16 people were killed, 450 injured, and thousands of homes damaged or destroyed.

50 years ago (8 Jun 1966)
The National Football League and the American Football League announced their merger. They would maintain separate leagues for the 1966 – 1969 seasons and then merge before the 1970 season, when they would form a combined league with 2 conferences. The combined league was called the National Football League (NFL).

50 years ago (13 Jun 1966)
The U.S. Supreme Court issued its landmark Miranda vs. Arizona decision. It ruled that police had to inform suspects of their constitutional rights (commonly known as the Miranda rights) before questioning them.

40 years ago (16 Jun 1976)
Soweto uprising, South Africa. Up to 20,000 black high school students held a protest rally in the streets of Soweto following the Afrikaans Medium Decree which ruled that black schools must teach subjects in Afrikaans as well as English. (Afrikaans was closely associated with apartheid and its popularity was in decline.) Police opened fire on the protesters, killing between 176 and 700 of them (the official figure was 23). Over 1,000 were injured.

40 years ago (29 Jun 1976)
The Seychelles gained its independence from the UK.

30 years ago (22 Jun 1986)
The ‘Hand of God’ goal: Argentine football player Diego Maradona scored a goal against England using his hand in the quarter-final of the 1986 FIFA World Cup in Mexico City. (The referee mistakenly thought he had used his head, so allowed the goal. England were knocked out of the World Cup as a result and Argentina went on to win it.)

25 years ago (12 Jun 1991)
Russian presidential election. Boris Yeltsin became the first directly elected President of Russia. (Inaugurated 10th July.)

25 years ago (14 Jun 1991)
Death of Dame Peggy Ashcroft, Academy Award-winning British stage, film and television actress.

25 years ago (15 Jun 1991)
Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines, erupted. The eruption was 10 times bigger than Mount St. Helens in 1980. 847 people were killed, mostly by roofs collapsing under the weight of wet ash. Hundreds of thousands of acres of agricultural land and forests were destroyed.

25 years ago (17 Jun 1991)
Apartheid: the South African Parliament voted to repeal the Population Registration Act (1950), which required that all inhabitants be classified according to their race. This eventually led to the abolition of apartheid.

25 years ago (25 Jun 1991)
Croatia and Slovenia gained their independence from Yugoslavia.

20 years ago (15 Jun 1996)
The centre of Manchester, England was devastated by an IRA bomb. 200 people were injured and the city centre had to be redeveloped because of the immense amount of damage.

20 years ago (20 Jun 1996)
Scientists announced that a vast freshwater lake (Lake Vostok) had been discovered 4 km (2.5 miles) beneath the ice in Antarctica.

15 years ago (1 Jun 2001)
8 members of the Nepalese royal family, including the King and Queen, were massacred by Crown Prince Dipendra, the heir to the throne. He then shot himself and died 3 days later. Gyanendra was crowned as the last King of Nepal on 4th June.

10 years ago (23 Jun 2006)
Death of Aaron Spelling, prolific American television and film producer (Charlie’s Angels, T. J. Hooker, The Love Boat, Fantasy Island, Hart to Hart, Beverly Hills 90210, Charmed and many more).


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What If? 31 Creative Writing Prompts for December

Monday, 30 November 2015

Here’s this month’s selection of What Ifs to stimulate your brain – what can you do with these? Some of them are deliberately vague or ambiguous so you can interpret them in different ways!

There’s one for each day of the month. If you need more please take a look at our book The Fastest Way to Get Ideas – 4,400 Essential What Ifs for Writers.

What if…

1. you lived at the top of the Eiffel Tower?

2. you lived at the top of Big Ben?

3. you lived in Buckingham Palace?

4. you lived at the White House?

5. you lived on a beach?

6. you lived on the streets?

7. you lived in your car?

8. you lived in a spaceship?

9. you lived on the Moon?

10. you lived on Mars?

11. you lived for the weekend?

12. parts of your home were no-go areas?

13. you had the choice of being exceptionally beautiful but having a short life, being of average appearance and living an average lifespan, or being exceptionally ugly and living to at least 120?

14. you could choose the way in which you died?

15. you could choose your time of death?

16. you were given a list of people you could become in your next life and were instructed to choose one?

17. you made a really bad choice?

18. poison had no effect on you?

19. radiation had no effect on you?

20. you could survive any injury?

21. you started a rumour that you knew was false, but so many people believed it and modified their actions accordingly that the rumour became true?

22. all the world’s currencies collapsed and money was scrapped?

23. a seemingly impossible prediction turned out to be correct?

24. a new superpower emerged?

25. the prohibitionists tried again?

26. you stopped trying to keep up with technology?

27. you stopped following the news?

28. the sound of music made you panic?

29. you decided to spend the rest of your life in bed?

30. you celebrated your birthday every day?

31. you did everything in time to music?

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50 Newsworthy Anniversaries in May 2016 for you to write about (and make money from)

Tuesday, 24 November 2015

Here are 50 newsworthy anniversaries coming up in May 2016 for you to write about (and make money from). The anniversaries are listed 6 months in advance to give you enough time to find markets, and research and write your articles.

We have painstakingly cross-checked every entry, but you are advised to check all facts again as part of your research. Please let us know of any errors you find.


The Date-A-Base Book 2016The listing below is a small sample of the entries for May from The Date-A-Base Book 2016
There are 285 anniversaries for May in the book, which covers the whole of 2016 from January to December and features more than 3,450 anniversaries in total.

Just one published article should cover the cost of your copy many times over.

If you need to work further ahead, The Date-A-Base Book 2017 is also available.

—–

200 years ago (11 May 1816)
The American Bible Society was founded in New York City.

150 years ago (16 May 1866)
The 5 cent coin (commonly known as a nickel) was introduced in the USA.

150 years ago (17 May 1866)
Birth of Erik Satie, influential French avant-garde composer and pianist.

150 years ago (29 May 1866)
Death of Winfield Scott, (‘Old Fuss and Feathers’), U.S. Army general. Noted for his emphasis on military formalities. He was also an unsuccessful presidential candidate in 1852.

125 years ago (5 May 1891)
Carnegie Hall in New York City, USA was officially opened. (It was known as Music Hall until 1893.)

100 years ago (5 May 1916 – 1924)
Banana Wars – the U.S. occupation of the Dominican Republic. U.S. forces gradually occupied the Dominican Republic to protect U.S. interests and quell civil disorder. On 7th May Dominican President Juan Isidro Jimenes Pereyra was ousted and Secretary of War, Desiderio Arias, seized power. The U.S. forced Arias to leave the capital, Santo Domingo, on 15th May.

100 years ago (7 May 1916)
Birth of Sir Huw Wheldon, British television presenter, producer and executive. Managing Director of BBC Television (1968-75).

100 years ago (10 May 1916)
Birth of Milton Babbitt, Pulitzer Prize-winning American composer, music theorist and teacher. Noted for his electronic music and use of serialist techniques, and for the mathematical/rhythmical precision of his work.

100 years ago (11 May 1916)
Albert Einstein’s theory of General Relativity was published in the physics journal Annalen der Physik. It describes how space-time is affected by energy, gravity, matter and momentum.

100 years ago (21 May 1916)
Birth of Harold Robbins, American novelist. One of the bestselling writers of all time. (The Carpetbaggers, The Dream Merchants, A Stone for Danny Fisher and more).

100 years ago (31 May – 1 Jun 1916)
World War I – the Battle of Jutland. The largest naval battle of the war. Result: inconclusive – both sides claimed victory.

80 years ago (9 May 1936)
Italian East Africa was established following Italy’s victory in the Second Italo-Ethiopian War.

80 years ago (22 May 1936)
Aer Lingus, Ireland’s national airline, began operating.

80 years ago (27 May 1936)
The British ocean liner RMS Queen Mary began her maiden voyage.

75 years ago (1 May 1941)
Orson Welles’ award-winning movie Citizen Kane was released in the USA. (UK: 24th January 1942.)

75 years ago (6 May 1941)
Joseph Stalin became Premier of the Soviet Union.

75 years ago (6 May 1941)
British-born American entertainer Bob Hope performed his first USO show at March Field, California, USA. (He continued to entertain U.S. troops until 1991, in WWII, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, the Lebanese Civil War, the Iran-Iraq War and the Gulf War – a total of 57 tours.)

75 years ago (9 May 1941)
World War II: the British Royal Navy captured the German submarine Enigma machine along with codebooks and documents which enabled British code-breakers to decipher coded German messages.

75 years ago (10 May 1941)
World War II: the last major attack on London during the Blitz caused heavy damage to many important buildings. These included the Houses of Parliament, Westminster Abbey, St James’s Palace and Lambeth Palace, several railway stations and hospitals, the British Museum and the Old Bailey. More than 1,300 people were killed.

75 years ago (12 May 1941)
German engineer Konrad Zuse completed his Z3 computer and presented it to an audience of scientists in Berlin. It is now recognised as the world’s first fully functional programmable digital computer. (No one outside Germany was aware of its existence at that time, so it had no influence on computer development in the UK or USA.)

75 years ago (15 May 1941)
The first flight by a jet-engined aircraft in the UK: the prototype Gloster E.28/39 fitted with a Whittle jet engine, at RAF Cranwell, Lincolnshire.

75 years ago (20 May – 1 Jun 1941)
World War II – the Battle of Crete. German paratroopers invaded and captured the island of Crete. This was the first mostly airborne invasion in military history. It was also the first battle in which the Allies used intelligence obtained from deciphering Germany’s Enigma code. It was also the first battle in which German forces encountered mass resistance from the civilian population.

75 years ago (24 May 1941)
World War II: the British battleship HMS Hood was sunk by the German battleship Bismarck near Iceland. (The British sunk the Bismarck three days later on 27th.)

75 years ago (30 May 1941)
Death of Rama VII (also known as Prajadhipok), last King of Siam (1925-35).

70 years ago (7 May 1946)
Sony, the Japanese consumer electronics company, was founded (as the Tokyo Telecommunications Engineering Corporation).

65 years ago (23 May 1951)
China annexed Tibet after pressuring Tibetan negotiators to sign a 17-point agreement – which many argue they had no real authority to sign and is therefore invalid. The Tibetan Government remained in place, but was dissolved in 1959 following an uprising that forced the Dalai Lama into exile. Tibet Autonomous Region was established in 1965.

65 years ago (28 May 1951)
The first episode of the radio comedy series The Goon Show was broadcast in the UK. (The first series was called Crazy People).

60 years ago (1 May 1956)
A public polio immunisation programme began in Britain, using the vaccine developed in the USA by Dr. Jonas Salk.

60 years ago (5 May 1956)
Elvis Presley reached #1 in the Billboard Top 10 Singles chart for the first time, with his song Heartbreak Hotel.

60 years ago (24 May 1956)
The first Eurovision Song Contest was held, in Lugano, Switzerland.

50 years ago (6 May 1966)
The Moors Murderers, Ian Brady and Myra Hindley, were sentenced to life imprisonment in the UK. Brady was convicted of 3 murders and Hindley of 2, though they later confessed to a total of 5. Their victims were aged between 10 and 17.

50 years ago (12 May 1966)
Busch Memorial Stadium in St. Louis, Missouri, USA officially opened. It was the home of the St. Louis Cardinals baseball team (1966-2005) and the Cardinals football team (1966-87). It was demolished in 2005 and replaced by the new Busch Stadium which opened on 4th April 2006.

50 years ago (16 May 1966)
Mao Zedong, Chairman of the Communist Party of China, issued the May 16 Notice. This signalled the beginning of the Cultural Revolution, which officially began on 1st August.

50 years ago (16 May 1966)
The album Pet Sounds by the Beach Boys was released.

50 years ago (16 May 1966)
The album Blonde on Blonde by Bob Dylan was released.

50 years ago (21 May 1966)
The newly established Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) declared war on the Irish Republican Army (IRA) in Northern Ireland and announced that any known IRA members would be immediately executed.

50 years ago (26 May 1966)
British Guiana gained its independence from the UK and became Guyana.

50 years ago (30 May 1966)
NASA launched its Surveyor 1 spacecraft on a mission to the Moon to collect data for the Apollo missions. On 2nd June it became the first U.S. craft to soft-land on another extraterrestrial body.

30 years ago (25 May 1986)
Hands Across America: Approximately 7 million people joined hands to form a line that stretched across the USA. The event was held to raise money to fight poverty, hunger and homelessness.

25 years ago (3 May 1991)
The last episode of the U.S. television soap opera Dallas was broadcast.

25 years ago (6 May 1991)
Death of Wilfrid Hyde-White, British stage, film and television actor. Noted for his many supporting and character roles. Best known for his role as Colonel Pickering in the film My Fair Lady.

25 years ago (14 May 1991)
Death of Jiang Qing (also known as Madame Mao), wife of the Chinese communist leader Mao Zedong. A member of the Gang of Four. Convicted of counter-revolutionary crimes in 1981 and sentenced to death – later commuted to life imprisonment. (Suicide.)

25 years ago (15 May 1991)
Edith Cresson became the first female Prime Minister of France.

25 years ago (18 May 1991)
Helen Sharman became the first British citizen to go into space, spending 7 days on Russia’s Mir space station.

25 years ago (21 May 1991)
Death of Rajiv Gandhi, Prime Minister of India (1984-89). (Assassinated.)

25 years ago (28 May 1991)
The Ethiopian Civil War ended after 16 years when the People’s Revolutionary Democratic Front (EPRDF) seized the capital Addis Ababa and overthrew the Marxist Derg regime.

20 years ago (17 May 1996)
U.S. President Bill Clinton signed Megan’s Law: the public must be notified if dangerous sex offenders are released into their community.

20 years ago (26 May 1996)
Whitewater scandal: U.S. President Bill Clinton’s former business partners in the Whitewater Development Corporation, James and Susan McDougal, and the Governor of Arkansas Jim Guy Tucker, were convicted of fraud and conspiracy. (Tucker received a suspended sentence due to his liver disease and resigned as Governor on 15th July. Susan McDougal was sentenced to 2 years. James McDougal was sentenced to 3 years and died in prison in March 1998.)

20 years ago (30 May 1996)
The Duke and Duchess of York – Prince Andrew and Sarah Ferguson – were divorced after 10 years of marriage.

10 years ago (1 May 2006)
BSE (mad cow disease): the European Union lifted its 10-year ban on the export of British beef.


Become a lifetime member of ideas4writers
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Price if purchased individually: £214.56
Save: £164.61

Click here to find out more or email us to ask a question

ideas4writers: inspiring you since 2002!

What If? 30 Creative Writing Prompts for November

Monday, 9 November 2015

Here’s this month’s selection of What Ifs to stimulate your brain – what can you do with these? Some of them are deliberately vague or ambiguous so you can interpret them in different ways!

There’s one for each day of the month. If you need more please take a look at our book The Fastest Way to Get Ideas – 4,400 Essential What Ifs for Writers.

What if…

1. you were a meal and it was lunchtime?

2. you could only remember one of each thing?

3. Earth’s highest mountains were actually molehills?

4. you could never go back?

5. something we currently consider a waste product turned out to be the most valuable substance on the planet?

6. madness took its toll?

7. the most amazing thing happened?

8. there was no room?

9. someone forgot to wind it up?

10. you couldn’t hear yourself think?

11. the shop was only open for 1 hour a day?

12. you weren’t allowed to do your bit?

13. space was not the final frontier?

14. the simplest solution turned out to be the most complicated?

15. a routine DNA test found that all/part of you was not human?

16. someone altered the President’s DNA by spraying something in his face?

17. you didn’t want any part of it?

18. your professional pride drove you to try harder?

19. the roads were gridlocked and not even emergency vehicles could get through?

20. the headline was totally misleading?

21. your spirit was crushed?

22. you were driven from your one true love?

23. you decided to abuse your power for the greater good?

24. you suddenly realised what they meant?

25. your talent was being wasted?

26. the supposed perks of working there didn’t actually exist?

27. the place intimidated you?

28. the customer was right after all?

29. you earned your danger money?

30. you had to be nice to someone who disgusted you?

Become a lifetime member of ideas4writers
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Price if purchased individually: £214.56
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ideas4writers: inspiring you since 2002

50 Newsworthy Anniversaries in April 2016 for you to write about (and make money from)

Monday, 19 October 2015

Here are 50 newsworthy anniversaries coming up in April 2016 for you to write about (and make money from). The anniversaries are listed 6 months in advance to give you enough time to find markets, and research and write your articles.

We have painstakingly cross-checked every entry, but you are advised to check all facts again as part of your research. Please let us know of any errors you find.


The Date-A-Base Book 2016The listing below is a small sample of the entries for April from The Date-A-Base Book 2016
There are 299 anniversaries for April in the book, which covers the whole of 2016 from January to December and features more than 3,450 anniversaries in total.

Just one published article should cover the cost of your copy many times over.

If you need to work further ahead, The Date-A-Base Book 2017 is also available.

—–

1000 years ago (23 Apr 1016)
Death of Æthelred II (Æthelred the Unready), (also spelled Ethelred), King of England (978-1013, 1014-16). Succeeded by his son Edmund II (Edmund Ironside).

400 years ago (23 Apr 1616 [old style] 3 May 1616 [new style])
Death of William Shakespeare, (‘the Bard of Avon’), English playwright, poet and actor. Regarded as the most important figure in English literature, and considered the greatest dramatist of all time, as well as England’s national poet. His plays include Hamlet, King Lear, Othello, Macbeth, Romeo and Juliet, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, The Merchant of Venice and many more.

200 years ago (21 Apr 1816)
Birth of Charlotte Brontë, British novelist. Best known for Jane Eyre.

150 years ago (9 Apr 1866)
The Civil Rights Act of 1866 came into effect in the USA. It affirmed that all U.S. citizens were equally protected by the law, thus protecting the civil rights of African Americans following the U.S. Civil War. (The Act came into effect despite 2 attempts by President Andrew Johnson to veto it.)

150 years ago (10 Apr 1866)
The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) was founded.

150 years ago (13 Apr 1866)
Birth of Butch Cassidy, American outlaw in the Old West. Leader of the Wild Bunch gang of train robbers and bank robbers.

100 years ago (5 Apr 1916)
Birth of Gregory Peck, Academy Award-winning American actor (To Kill a Mockingbird, Moby Dick, The Guns of Navarone, Cape Fear, How the West Was Won, The Omen, The Boys from Brazil and more). Named one of the greatest Hollywood actors of all time.

100 years ago (10 Apr 1916)
The Professional Golfers’ Association of America was founded.

100 years ago (22 Apr 1916)
Birth of Yehudi Menuhin, American-born British violin virtuoso and conductor. Regarded as one of the greatest violinists of the 20th century.

100 years ago (24 – 29 Apr 1916)
The Easter Rising, Dublin, Ireland – an armed Republican uprising against British rule. 466 people were killed. The rebels surrendered unconditionally on 29th after the British declared martial law and suppressed the rebellion. Most of the leaders were executed.

100 years ago (25 Apr 1916)
Anzac Day was officially celebrated for the first time.

100 years ago (28 Apr 1916)
Birth of Ferruccio Lamborghini, Italian industrialist who founded Lamborghini, the luxury sports car manufacturer.

80 years ago (19 Apr 1936 – 1939)
The Arab Revolt (also known as the Great Uprising) began in Palestine with a general strike that lasted until October.

75 years ago (6 Apr 1941)
World War II: Germany invaded Greece and Yugoslavia (see below).

75 years ago (10 Apr – 27 Nov 1941)
World War II – Western Desert Campaign – the Siege of Tobruk (Libya). Allied victory.

75 years ago (12 Apr 1941)
Birth of Bobby Moore, British footballer. Captain of the England squad which won the 1966 World Cup. (Died 1993.)

75 years ago (15 Apr & 4 May 1941)
The Belfast Blitz, Northern Ireland. 1,050 people were killed in two German air raids on the city.

75 years ago (17 Apr 1941)
World War II: Yugoslavia surrendered to Germany.

75 years ago (18 Apr 1941)
Death of Alexandros Koryzis, Prime Minister of Greece. (Suicide.) Succeeded by Emmanouil Tsouderos (on 21st) who then became Prime Minister of the Greek Government in Exile (on 29th).

70 years ago (1 Apr 1946)
Aleutian Islands earthquake, Alaska, USA. 6 people were killed in Alaska. A tsunami then struck Hawaii, killing a further 159 people.

70 years ago (17 Apr 1946)
Syria gained its independence from France.

70 years ago (18 Apr 1946)
The League of Nations was officially dissolved. It transferred all of its activities to the United Nations. (UN established 24th October 1945).

60 years ago (2 Apr 1956)
The first episodes of the soap operas As the World Turns and The Edge of Night were broadcast on CBS TV in the USA.

60 years ago (6 Apr 1956)
The Capitol Records Building (also known as the Capitol Records Tower) opened in Hollywood, Los Angeles, California, USA. The iconic 13-storey tower resembles a stack of records on a turntable.

60 years ago (7 Apr 1956)
Morocco became an independent country when France and Spain relinquished their protectorate. Sultan Mohammed V formed a government. (He became King of Morocco in 1957.)

60 years ago (17 Apr 1956)
Cominform (the Communist Information Bureau) was dissolved as part of the Soviet Union’s programme of reconciliation with Yugoslavia.

60 years ago (18 Apr 1956)
American film actress Grace Kelly married Prince Rainier III of Monaco, becoming Princess Grace of Monaco.

60 years ago (21 Apr 1956)
Elvis Presley’s song Heartbreak Hotel became his first to reach #1 in the U.S. music charts.

60 years ago (26 Apr 1956)
The world’s first commercially successful container ship went into service, launching a revolution in transportation. The SS Ideal X was a converted WWII oil tanker which carried 58 containers from Newark, New Jersey to Houston, Texas on its first voyage. (It was not the first container ship. The first was the Clifford J. Rodgers which went into service in 1955.)

50 years ago (1 Apr 1966)
Death of Flann O’Brien, Irish novelist, playwright, newspaper columnist and humorist. Noted for his satire. One of the leading Irish writers of the 20th century.

50 years ago (2 Apr 1966)
Death of C. S. Forester, British historical novelist. Best known for The African Queen and for his series of novels featuring the British naval officer Horatio Hornblower during the Napoleonic Wars.

50 years ago (3 Apr 1966)
The Soviet Union’s Luna 10 spacecraft reached the Moon and went into orbit around it. It was the first spacecraft to orbit the Moon. It orbited 460 times before its batteries expired and its radio signal was lost on 30th May.

50 years ago (10 Apr 1966)
Death of Evelyn Waugh, British satirical novelist, biographer and travel writer (Decline and Fall, A Handful of Dust, Brideshead Revisited, Sword of Honour).

50 years ago (26 Apr 1966)
Tashkent earthquake, Uzbekistan. Most of the old city was destroyed and about 300,000 people were left homeless.

40 years ago (1 Apr 1976)
Apple Computer (now Apple, inc.) was founded in California, USA.

40 years ago (5 Apr 1976)
James Callaghan became British Prime Minister following Harold Wilson’s resignation.

30 years ago (5 Apr 1986)
Libyan terrorists bombed La Belle Discotheque in Berlin, Germany. The disco was popular with U.S. servicemen. 3 people were killed and over 200 injured – many of them U.S. servicemen. (The USA retaliated by bombing Libya on 15th April.)

30 years ago (8 Apr 1986)
American actor Clint Eastwood was elected mayor of Carmel, California.

30 years ago (17 Apr 1986)
British television journalist John McCarthy was kidnapped in Beirut, Lebanon by the militant group Islamic Jihad. (Released August 1991.)

30 years ago (26 Apr 1986)
Chernobyl disaster, Ukraine, Soviet Union. The world’s worst nuclear power plant accident. 31 people were killed in the explosion and fire, and leaked radiation spread across the western Soviet Union and Europe.

25 years ago (3 Apr 1991)
Death of Graham Greene, British novelist, short story writer, playwright and journalist (Brighton Rock, Our Man in Havana and many more).

25 years ago (10 Apr 1991)
Moby Prince ferry disaster, Livorno, Italy. A car/passenger ferry hit an oil tanker in dense fog and caught fire. 140 people were killed. 1 young boy was the only survivor.

25 years ago (15 Apr 1991)
The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development opened in London. Its purpose is to aid economic development in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union.

25 years ago (16 Apr 1991)
Death of Sir David Lean, award-winning British film director (Lawrence of Arabia, Dr. Zhivago, A Passage to India and more).

25 years ago (20 Apr 1991)
Death of Steve Marriott, British rock singer, songwriter and guitarist (Small Faces, Humble Pie).

25 years ago (23 Apr 1991)
Death of Johnny Thunders, American rock guitarist, singer and songwriter (New York Dolls, The Heartbreakers).

25 years ago (29 Apr 1991)
Bangladesh was hit by one of the deadliest tropical cyclones ever recorded. 138,000 people were killed and 10 million left homeless.

20 years ago (11 Apr 1996)
Düsseldorf Airport fire, Germany. A fire in the passenger terminal killed 17 people and injured more than 60. (Cause: welding work on an elevated access road above the terminal resulted in molten metal dropping onto polystyrene insulation in the terminal building’s roof, setting it alight.)

20 years ago (16 Apr 1996)
France Télécom launched its Wanadoo internet service. (It took over the British service Freeserve in 2000 and was rebranded as Orange in 2006.)

20 years ago (28 – 29 Apr 1996)
Port Arthur massacre, Tasmania, Australia. A psychologically disturbed local resident (Martin Bryant) killed 35 people in a shooting spree.


Become a lifetime member of ideas4writers
and get ALL our ebooks for just £49.95

(or the equivalent in your local currency)

Price if purchased individually: £214.56
Save: £164.61

Click here to find out more or email us to ask a question

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